Posts in Text Analytics Poll
Advertising Effecitveness +OdinText

ad testing +OdinText [Authors note. As I am writing this blog post early Monday morning after the Super Bowl, I have already completed the initial ad testing analysis. It’s the case where modern AI and analytics software (OdinText) is faster than the data collection process/vendor we’re relying on. We’ve asked an open ended comment question among n=3,000 respondents about which super bowl ads they like/dislike and why. Eager to have the analysis complete as soon as possible, the analysis is already done, and blog written based on n=1,011 initial responses received. But since 1,998 more are expected I’m painfully waiting to publish results until the rest of the fielding comes in. The bad part is waiting for the sample. The good part is knowing that now repeating the analysis will literally take less than 1 minute. Just uploading the data into OdinText, and then the brand names and advertisement likes and dislikes will automatically be coded, analyzed and charted in seconds. I just have to review if anything has changed materially and make small updates in my copy below in such case. As it turned out, more data did change findings, and so I did have to change my blog copy. Ah, the joys of modern analytics!]

 

The Advertising Pundits weighed in on which ads were best and worst even before the Super Bowl aired. We tend to do things a little differently at OdinText and allow data, not opinion to drive.

Of course, for "best" and "worst" not to be subjective, we need some definition of desired outcomes. Last year we looked at a simple formula to evaluate efficacy consisting of Awareness + Positive Sentiment/Liking of the ads.

For instance, you may not remember this because of the low sentiment, but last year 85 Lumber was one of the companies with the highest Awareness after the super bowl. However, because it also had low sentiment and relevancy (as it dealt with the explosive issue of immigration/Trump's wall in a somewhat ambiguous way). It's probably the case that it ended up doing better among its core customer segments than among the general population, but since Super Bowl Ads are expensive, I argued that all things equal, a strategy with a broader target in mind, which aims to leave a positive impact among this broader group, should provide a better ROI. Looking at it another way, to have the most significant positive impact we want to maximize both awareness and sentiment almost equally.

With those assumptions and comments from over 3,000 respondents, OdinText's AI predicted which of the Super Bowl Ads were successful, and which were not. Below I've shown 10 Brands/ads, the best performing 6 and the worst 4.

OdinText Ad Ratings

10 superbowl ads rated

THE WINNERS

#1. THE NFL

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUoD-gPDahw

 

In a year where there has been a lot of controversy surrounding NFL players taking a knee, and with a few of our respondents explicitly stating that they had boycotted the Super Bowl this year, it interesting to see the NFL advertising, and doing it so well. The NFL's Dirty Dancing with Manning and Beckham performed best, I believe in part because of its high relevance to the audience, but also for garnering high awareness together with very high positive sentiment/liking. In fact, only one other ad came close in sentiment.

#2 AMAZON ALEXA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J6-8DQALGt4

 

That second most well-liked ad was Amazon's Alexa. Not as much because of its awareness (which was rather low in comparison), but because of its extremely high sentiment. The audience loved the various famous actors playing the voice of Alexa at least as much as they enjoyed NFL players Dirty Dancing.

#3 TIDE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=doP7xKdGOKs

In 3rd place we have Tide. They earned the spot less so for sentiment (though viewers did like the ad). The reason Tide did so well was primarily due to the awareness it garnered. Tide had THE HIGHEST awareness of any Super Bowl Ad. However contrary to some of the Advertising Pundits opinions, it just wasn't quite as consistently well-liked by viewers as Dirty Dancing, and Alexa.

If you are in the camp who believe Awareness is everything, then Tide should have an even higher spot.

#3 DORITOS (& MOUNTAIN DEW ICE)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=10&v=4eKYR_iL5eU

Doritos + Mountain Dew Ice was so close in our model, that I’m going to give them a tie for 3rd. Not awareness like Tide, but for balancing both positive sentiment and awareness perfectly. It's mix of awareness and liking was in the same proportions as NFL Dirty Dancing, just at a slightly smaller scale.

Obviously considering the audience and occasion, just like the NFL ad, Doritos especially is a highly relevant product, and as importantly the humorous approach with two extremely popular yet not commonly seen together stars (Namely Morgan Freeman and Peter Dinglage/Tyron from Game of Thrones) succeeded in the unique Combo messaging of Fire & Ice.

#5 BUD-LIGHT (NOT BUDWEISER)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CxGUmtRLm5g

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvTE_5c7buk

 

Budweiser is almost expected to do well. So, in a way, it may be surprising to see it doesn’t make it into our analysis (Beer, in general, did poorly especially Miller Ultra). It really should be so easy for Budweiser though. Here's a case where the occasion is more than just relevant, it's almost as if the brand has a historic Super Bowl halo effect. That said, their performance was less than impressive.

While the idea of stopping the Budweiser line to make water in an emergency could be touching for some, reminding consumers you have a good fun product may be a safer strategy than asking for kudos for merely being a good corporate citizen?

And that’s where Bud-Light’s Knight did better. Beer should be about fun…

#6 TOYOTA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwF3ipuNyfc

Here's a case where awareness was quite low, but the ad was still more liked than average compared to the other brands. Toyota and our #8 brand just barely made the list. While the setting was right "The Super Bowl," in the end perhaps the ‘Priest, an Imam, a Monk and a Rabbi' may have felt a bit less like a joke, and more like preaching…

THE LOSERS

#1 COCA-COLA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-R-EEdvDrUU

Like Budweiser, we expect a lot from Coca-Cola when it comes to advertising. They’ve been pushing the diversity message for a few years now. It may be that pulling at heart strings is far harder to do than making people laugh. Coca-Cola had lower than average sentiment coupled with relatively low awareness. Not a winning combination.

#2 DODGE RAM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlbY1tGARUA

 

Dodge Ram did better than Coca-Cola at least, especially on awareness, but even concerning sentiment/liking.

The negative aspect of course in large part was the appropriateness of Martin Luther King's message at the beginning.

When it comes to ads like these though, I think we must assume, as was the case for 85 Lumber last year, that perhaps the brand knows what it's doing. They aren't there to please everyone (as you would hope is the goal of Pepsi and Coca-Cola), but to message their core audience with a ‘We Get You – Even if Everyone Else Doesn't'. And so, awareness wise, Ram did better than Amazon, Bud-Light, and Pepsi. But on an overall basis, they get dinged by the overall sentiment due to the some would say clumsy ‘MLK + Patriotic' messaging. Only time and sales will tell…

#3 T-MOBILE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-rumHvmqCA

T-Mobile was less well liked than you’d think, who doesn’t like babies right? Turns out people are getting tired of the “social responsibility ads” in their entertainment, at least that’s what they told us.

#4 DIET COKE (TWISTED MANGO)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6T6YrPA4aM

The Booby Prize. Ok, so here is a bad ad. In PR they used to say, any PR is good PR. But Diet Coke didn't do too well on either of our metrics. It had low awareness combined with even lower sentiment/liking. Diet Coke Mango, because, just no…

 

HALF TIME

A WORD ABOUT PEPSI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2z3EUY1aXdY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0gHYd67OumQ

Pepsi, what can I say.  You may be surprised that yet again, Pepsi performed poorly compared to the other brands I mentoned considering that their name was all over the Super Bowl during the Half Time Show. And yet, it may be that the real winner of Halftime is the brand of the performer, which this year was Justin Timberlake. We saw a similar pattern last year as well.

 

@TomHCAnderson

PS. See Your Data +OdinText

 

Trump’s Brand Positioning One Year In

State of The POTUS - Text Analytics Reveals the Reasons Behind Trumps Approval Ratings

Over the past few weeks we’ve heard political pundits on all major news networks chime in on how Trump is doing one year after taking office. Part of the discussion is around what he has and hasn’t done, but an even bigger part continues to be about how he is perceived, both domestically and abroad, and some very grim opinion/approval polling is available. Many polls  have Trump as the President with the lowest approval ratings in history.

Sadly, Political Polling, including approval ratings, tells us absolutely nothing about the underlying causes for the ratings. Therefore, I thought I’d share our findings in this area. Utilizing our text analytics software, OdinText, we have been tracking not just sentiment related to Trump, but more importantly, the positioning of 40+ topics/themes that are important predictors of the sentiment.. In the brief analysis below, I will not have time to go into each of the attributes we have identified as important drivers, I will focus on a few of the areas which have seen the most change for Trump during the past year.

How has the opinion of Trump changed in the minds of the American people?

By looking at Trump’s positioning just before he took office (with all the campaign positioning fresh in the minds of the people), and comparing it to half a year into his office, and again now a full year into office, we can get a good idea about the impact various issues have on approval ratings and even more importantly, positioning.

Let’s start by looking back to just before he was elected. OdinText’s Ai uncovered the 15 most significant changes in perception since just before Trump won the election and now. Trump has fallen on 11 of these attributes and increased on 4.

Trump Pre Election Positioning VS One Year In

If we compare Trump just before the election VS Trump today, we several key differences. More recently four themes have become more important in terms of describing what Trump stands for in the minds of Americans when we include everyone (both those who like and dislike him). These newer positions are “Less Regulation”, “Healthcare Reform”, “Money/Greed”, and “Dishonesty”. Interestingly, text analytics reveals that one of the important issues seems to be changing, Trumps supporters are now more likely to be use the term “Healthcare Reform” rather than the previous “Repeal Obamacare”.

Other than the repeal of Obamacare issue, prior to the election, in the minds of Americans Trump was more likely to be associated with “Gun Rights”, “Honesty”, “Trade Deals”, “Change”, Supporting “Pro Life”, pro and con “Immigration” related issues including “The Wall”, and finally his slogan “MAGA” (Make America Great Again).

The decrease in relevance of many of these issues has to do with pre-election positioning, both by the Trump/Republican Party, as well as the Democrats Counter Positioning of him. After the election seemingly, some of these like ‘Gun Control’ have become less important for various reasons.

Five Months from Record Low

If we look at changes between this past Summer and now, there has been significantly less movement in terms of his positioning in American minds. He has seen a slight but significant bump in overall positive emotional sentiment/Joy, and the MAGA positioning as well as on Taxes, the economy, and The Wall, while also seeing a decrease in “Anger” and “Hate/Racism” which peaked this summer.

His lowest point so far in the minds of Americans was during the August 12th, 2017 White Nationalist Rally in Charlottesville. Trump’s positioning as a Hate Monger was almost as high as the weekend before the election, while simultaneously positive emotional sentiment and ‘MAGA’ among his supporters was at an all time low.

Since the August low Trump does appear to have rebounded some, and while one year into office many believe the one thing Trump now stands for is himself, greed and money are a lesser evil in America than hate and racism.

It seems that one year into office, at least for now, the economy and tax cuts are giving Trump a bit of a bump back to pre-election levels in the minds of many Americans.

I’m not sure what the future holds in this case, but I hope you like me found some of the underlying reasons for his approval ratings of interest. These are after all more important than simple ratings, because these reasons are levers that can be changed to affect the final outcomes and positioning of any brand, including that of a POTUS.

@TomHCAnderson

 

[Note: Curious if OdinText’s new Ai can help you understand what drives your brands ratings? Request more info or early access to our brand new release here]

Best 10 Text Analytics Tips Posts of The Year

Our Top 10 Most Read Data and Text Mining Posts of 2017

Thank you for reading our blog this year. The OdinText blog has quickly become even more popular than the Next Gen Market Research blog, and I really appreciate the thoughtful feedback we’ve gotten here on the blog, via Twitter, and email.

In case you’re curious, here are the most popular posts of the year:

#10 NFL Players Taking a Knee is More Complex and Polarizing Than We Think If a Topic is Worth Quantifying – It’s Also Worth Understanding The Why’s Behind It

#9 Text Analytics Picks The 10 Strongest Super Bowl Ads New Text Analytics Poll Shows Which Super Bowl Ads Really Performed Best

#8 Why Your HR Survey is a Lie and How to Get The Truth OdinText Discovers Job Satisfaction Drivers in Anonymous Employee Data

#7 Of Tears & Text Analytics (An OdinText User Story – Text Analytics Guest Post (AI Meets VOC))

#6 65 CEO’s Share Thoughts on Insights (Insights Associations Inaugural CEO Summit – A Future Tied to Collaboration and Technology)

#5 Why Machine Learning is Meaningless (Beware of Buzzwords! The Truth about ‘Machine Learning’ and ‘Artificial Intelligence’)

#4 Do You Speak Teen? OdinText Announces 2nd Annual List of Top 10 Slang Terms (How Text Analytics Can Help Marketers Move at the Speed of Slang)

#3 Text Analysis Reveals Potential French Election French Election Upset (Text Analytics Poll Showed How Close Le Pen Came to ‘Trumping’ Macron)

#2 Text Analytics Poll: Why We Unfriend on Facebook (You Can’t Handle The Truth (And Other Top Reasons Why We Unfriend on Facebook)

#1 What Americans Really Think About Trump’s Immigration Ban and Why (Text Analysis of What People Say in Their Own Words Reveals More Than Multi-Choice Surveys)

 

I thought I’d also check what our top 5 posts were from last year as well, here they are in case you missed them:

Top Posts From 2016

#1 Text Analysis Answers Is The Quran Really More Violent Than The Bible (3 Parts)

#2 Attensity Sold – What Does it Mean?

#3 Customer Satisfaction Surveys: What do Satisfied VS Dissatisfied Customers Talk About?

#4 What’s Really Wrong With Polling?

#5 What Your Customer Satisfaction Research Isn’t Telling You

Thanks again for reading and commenting. As always I welcome your thoughts and questions via LinkedIn, or feel free to request info on anything you’ve read above here.

Happy New Year!

@TomHCAnderson

Happy Hanukkah and Hottest Gift Ideas for 2017
Text Analytics Poll Reveals Hottest Holiday Gift Ideas

Tomorrow marks the beginning of Hanukkah, and Christmas is just around the corner. So, I thought what better time to use OdinText to investigate ideas for gift giving.

Top 10 Hottest Gifts Ideas for 2017

If you’re out of ideas on what to get your loved ones you may want to consider these popular ideas

  1. Mobile Phones iphonex

Well iPhone X to be exact. While smart phones in general are by far the most popular gift this year, iPhones specifically were mentioned twice as often as any cell phones in general, and no other specific brand even came close in mentions.

  1. Gift Cards Gift Cards

They’re a more popular choice than one would think. Sure, it’s fun to receive the perfect gift – Like an iPhone X – but in lieu of that gift cards are a cheaper more popular option among both gifters and receivers.

  1. Fingerlings Fingerlings

For younger friends and family, there are several choices that popped, especially these AI enabled tiny creatures. They're cute and they react to voice and touch. These little guys were mentioned about as often as Gift Cards!

  1. Amazon Echo or Google Home 

Amazon Echo being far more often mentioned than Google Home, both are hot this years. [ While various Apple accessories were popular in our data (including Apple Watch), Apple HomePod was not.]

  1. Fidget Spinners 

Yes, these darned things are still around, and by the sound of it are likely to make it into a lot of stockings

  1. Drones 

A bit on the more expensive side, drones are still a very hot gift and there are many options and prices.

  1. Lol Dolls 

For younger girls these small collectible dolls like a lot of products these days are very much about the packaging. They and their accessories come in small palls that are cracked open. Part of the fun and ‘cuteness’ (a trend called kawaii that’s been on it’s way here from Japan for some time and is now arriving)

  1. Hatchimals 

Similar to LoL Dolls, but a step beyond with an interesting twist. These creatures come in eggs, and hatch in weird ways. The more expensive ones have AI that interacts with the child. The creature responds to stroking/heating of the egg, and then hatches.

  1. Tickle Me Elmo 

This little guy never went away. Still a safe bet for the little Guy or Gal in your life.

  1. PopSockets 

At 10th place is also the cheapest option of the bunch. If you opt for # 1 above, you may as well go all out and get one of these little smart phone accessories too. They won’t break the bank!

Hopefully these gave you some ideas. If you have any for us we’d love to hear them below.

@TomHCAnderson

 

[Note, OdinText analyzed well over 5,000 comments related to the holidays and gift giving, above is just a small sample of the insights available in the data. I’ll may share a bit more on this before Christmas as time permits.]

PS. There's still time for you to get OdinText for 2018 and to instantly be able to analyze any kind of data. Take advantage of our year end offer and get trained and start analyzing data free in 2017.

Text Analytics Reveals the Average American Thanksgiving Menu

American’s Recount the Items That Make Up Their Annual Thanksgiving Dinner That most American Holiday, Thanksgiving, is here. But other than Turkey, what does the typical thanksgiving dinner consist of?

Last year for Thanksgiving we used the OdinText Analytics platform to understand what Americans are most thankful for. This year we were curious which items other than Turkey grace the Thanksgiving table.

Without further ado, here are the 50 most frequently mentioned items.

50 Thanksgiving Items Text Analytics

There were some differences by various demographic cuts from gender, age and geography. Below we look at the four major US geographies across 7 items with some of the biggest differences.

Regional Thanksgiving Differences Text Analytics

It is in fact possible to predict where someone lives with relative accuracy based on how they describe their Thanksgiving table.

For instance, Northeasterners are far more likely to expect Squash and Brussel Sprouts, and far less likely to have deviled eggs.

Midwesterners are more likely to mention Noodles, Deviled Eggs, and anything “creamy”, and less likely to mention Squash or Brussel Sprouts.

In the West potatoes, olives and wine are more likely to be mentioned, while Brussel Sprouts, Corn, Squash and Dressing are less popular.

Southerners like Deviled Eggs, cheese and broccoli and less likely to mention olives or noodles

While text analytics is a very quantitative science, it is worth pointing out that drilling into comments for a qualitative feel of descriptors is often worthwhile. For example, something as simple as ‘Dressing’ or ‘Green Bean Casserole’ can often be described with high emotion and specific reference to family members who typically make the dish very well, i.e. “And of Course, Grandma’s Dressing” or “Uncle Joe’s delicious Green Beans, I have no idea what he put’s in there, it’s just awesome…”

What are your favorite dishes?

Happy Thanksgiving!

@TomHCAnderson

 

[Note: This Text Analytics Poll was conducted among n=1,500 Gen Pop Americans ages 18-65 November 19-21, 2017 and text analyzed with OdinText. For more information on OdinText see Info Request]

Americans Resigned to Gun Violence?

New Text Analytics Poll Measures American’s Desire for Change After Vegas Shooting 

In the wake of the awful tragedy in Las Vegas Monday I like many others viewed the news with shock, sadness, disgust and disbelief. And I believe also with a feeling of helplessness. At least that’s what I prefer to think of it as rather than apathy. The number shot and killed was horrific, but not any more horrific than the Sandy Hook shootings which occurred less than an hour away from us here in Connecticut.

What is the tipping point I wondered Monday morning? How bad does it have to get before people demand change, and what does change look like. Certainly for many an outright ban on all guns would be desired I thought, or would it? In the minds of a sizeable group it seems the second Amendment is as important as freedom itself.  But to affect real change we need some consensus if not a majority.

I took the question to representative sample of 1,600 Americans fielded Tuesday - Thursday. Rather than simply asking whether they agreed or disagreed with more gun control, the NRA, second Amendment or some such topic I simply stated “ Gun control is a difficult issue in the US. Reasonably what things do you think could be done about it? [Please as specific as possible]

The kinds of insights possible with open unstructured questions are impossible to get with forced/multiple choice type questions. The comments represented below represent peoples initial thoughts and responses in their own words off the top of their heads without any influence or suggestions.

Most Popular Answer – “Nothing”

Below is a visualization of the free form answers to the question. Frequency of topic answers on the Y axis, and speed of answering on the X axis.

What could be done about gun control poll

The most frequent answer to this question among US adults after the worst shooting in US history is “Nothing”. Those answering nothing gave the question exactly 49 seconds of thought on average before answering. Let that sink in for a minute.

Looking toward the right of the plot, we can see those answers which were given after slightly more thought. For instance, the suggestion of “One Gun Per Person”, while given by extremely few people, was given after slightly longer deliberation. Certainly, the second most popular answer “Background Checks” doesn’t seem to be cutting it.

Relative Frequency of Suggested Solutions

Taking a closer look at some of the more popular suggestions, the chart below tells us a bit about where the population is in understanding the issue.

Gun Violence 2

Summarizing this chart, I would say the average American still doesn’t seem willing to take radical steps to curtail gun access and violence.

Almost none of the suggestions would have stopped the Vegas shooter. Hardly anyone suggested strict gun laws such as those in countries like Japan where guns are no longer a problem. “One Gun Per Person” is an interesting but rare suggestion that would also have helped in the Vegas shooting.

However, many of the most popular suggestions, like “Background Checks”, “Banning Automatic Weapons”, “Mental Health Detection” would not have been helpful. Yet others like “Eliminate Semi-automatics” and “Regulate Caliber of Guns” show a real lack of understanding about guns.

An unexpected suggestion picked up by our software was the banning of “Bump/Slide Fire Stocks”. This was mentioned by almost 2% of those giving suggestions. While this answer does show strong understanding of guns and the ‘hack’ the shooter used to fire as if his guns were fully automatic, it is perhaps one of the scariest answers in the chart, and one that even the NRA seems to be willing to accept.

Banning Bump stocks is not likely to make any serious impact at all on future gun violence and is just a distraction and a scape goat. This is unfortunately likely to become a big talking point on the Hill.

Non- Gun Owners who don’t understand fire arms enough to make distinction between jargon and real improvements to our safety owe it to themselves to get educated enough to debate these issues and rally for real change.

Don’t be apathetic, don’t be helpless, make change happen!

@TomHCAnderson

NFL Players Taking a Knee is More Complex and Polarizing than We Think

If a topic is worth quantifying - it’s also worth understanding the 'Why’s' behind it I think I’ve seen at least 10 polls on the NFL Protest issue in the last week. As usual, these polls are simple structured questions, sadly usually not much more than a simple agree or disagree option. For example, the CNN poll released this weekend showing 49% Against 43% Supporting, (I’m not quite sure what happened to the remaining 8%). A PBS/Marist Poll had 48% of Americans saying protests were respectful and 46% disrespectful. Yet another, Seaton Hall Poll, had 84% supporting the players right to protest!

Which of these is correct??? It seems with structured questions, you really do Receive what you Ask for

It’s different when you allow people to answer whatever they want. As we have done here on the blog several times before, in order to challenge structured/forced-answer polling and explore the results we get when people are allowed to say anything they want about a topic. This weekend we asked 1,500 Americans 1 single question:

“Q. What are your thoughts about NFL Players 'Taking a Knee' during the national anthem? [Please elaborate why you are for or against what these players are doing]”

We utilized our text analytics software platform OdinText to classify responses into 3 groups. Those clearly against the players protesting (46%), those supporting the players taking a knee (33%), and those who did not take a clear position either way, i.e. they either did not care, understand, or had more mixed emotions on the topic (21%). We then weighted these groups based on location, age, and gender to as accurately as possible project onto the general US population. Post weighting comments fell out slightly more even, though still with a majority Against the protests (43%), over a third Supporting player protests (37%) and one in five not taking a side explicitly (21%).

NFL OdinText Chart 1

In past text analytics polls, we have seen differences from other mainstream structured polls which seem to indicate text polls can provide slightly different, more accurate proportions as they relate to actual behavior (our pre-election TextPoll indicated the Trump-Clinton upset ahead of time).

We believe this may partly be due to the fact that when you ask someone why they feel a certain way, there is additional cognition when answering. Of course the true beauty of text analytics lies in better understanding and quantifying the relative importance of the various Why’s.

The WHY's Behind The Opinions

Visualizing the comment data about WHY Americans actually feel the way they do about the protests quickly paints a picture of the sentiment and the reasons behind them.

OdinText nfl vizualization 2

Along the X axis from left (those against the protests in red) to right (those supporting the protests in green), with Y axis representing frequency of mentions, we see that “disrespectfulness” is the most frequently occurring theme, and it is indeed more frequently mentioned than the primary reason for supporting the protests on the right in green “freedom of speech”.

In the chart below we can see the most important reasons WHY fans agree or disagree with player protests even more clearly (sorted by difference gap).

NFL OdinText chart 3

Beyond looking at sentiment and what was answered, with text analytics we may even consider the mechanics of how questions were answered. Those who were not clearly for one side or the other, while answering fastest (49 seconds on average) and having shorter answers on average tended to use slightly longer/complex words. Those Against, while taking longest to answer (1.5 min on average) tended to have responses of more similar sentence and word length as those Supporting the player protests (though the latter group answered somewhat faster, in about 1 minute). This longer response time might give some indication on the relative importance of the issue to the group, i.e. those Against the protesters may take the issue more seriously/personally.

The most interesting thing here, though of course, are the specific topics mentioned by the two groups. Among those Against the players taking a knee, Disrespect for flag, Country and Armed service members was the most frequent issue mentioned. Several mentioned that they would be choosing not to watch Football/NFL. Among respondents who self identified as Veterans in their response, somewhat more were in the Against camp.

Freedom of Speech, and the Right to Peaceful Protest were the two most mentioned topics related to Support for player protests.

The two sides seem to differ most on the appropriateness of venue, with many of those disagreeing with the players, pointing out that they are well paid (over paid in fact), and that the work place/NFL/Entertainment is not the place for politics. The idea of appropriateness not just of venue, but respect for flag and country was also brought up frequently by those with more Mixed opinions.

Don't Forget to Drill Down Some

I would be remiss if I told you three simple charts were sufficient in order to understand the American Psyche on an emotionally charged issue such as this one. One of our users pointed this out quite elegantly in a guest post recently here.

While many times a good visualization or two are enough to communicate everything you need to know in a text analysis, other times, we do need to remind ourselves to give a few actual example quotes.

While obviously not in our data for this study, I believe Obama may have said things well on the NFL Protests before leaving office “I believe that us honoring our flag and our anthem is part of what binds us together as a nation. But I also always try to remind folks that part of what makes this country special is that we respect people's rights to have a different opinion…it is important for everybody to listen to each other. I want (the protesters) to listen to the pain that that may cause somebody who, for example, had a spouse or a child who was killed in combat and why it hurts them to see somebody not standing… But I also want people to think about the pain he may be expressing about somebody who's lost a loved one that they think was unfairly shot."

I’m leaving you below with about a dozen sample quotes (more than I usually would recommend) for each of the three groups we identified above [sic]. These days, perhaps more so than ever before, I think we really do need to take the time to listen to each other. I welcome your thoughts to this post below, and am curious if any of the specific example quotes below resonate with you and if so which one?

AGAINST

“stupid disrespectful to our soldiers these are paid men just do your job what if doctors and nurses stated their political views when you where going into surgery a person wouldn't care for that either”

“I'm completely against it as an immigrant i have always been in awe of america's patriotism in this political climate we need to stand strong together and love our country otherwise this country will not last”

“i think it disrespects the u.s the national anthem an the american flag and is an inappropriate expression of private political views in the workplace during the player's performance of his duties and disrespects the fact that the fans in the stands have paid their hard earned money to watch a football game not to be subjected to the political views of the players the fans aren't paying for their tickets so that players can express themselves at work”

“im all for free speech but not during our national anthem i find it completely disrespectful for the true heroes that chose not to sit down and fought for our country there is no debate it's classless and demeaning and a distraction to sports”

“I am not allowed to make political statements at my job they shouldn't at theirs either the NFL wouldn't let the cowboys wear a patch in support of police yet it will allow this madness I am done with the NFL for life”

“Just play football I don't tune in to have politics pushed in my face if i wanted to hear others political views I'd watch cnn not the NFL”

“wWhy not protest any cause that anyone thinks of, valid or not, have no order at public events everything wrong in the world should be protested not just selected causes not fair to just limit to a few causes”

“As a veteran I am completely against anyone who takes a knee or protests during our national anthem I understand people feeling a need to peacefully protest but during our national anthem is not the time”

“Counterproductive and self indulgent inevitably perceived as a poke in the eye to the USA protest doesn't illuminate the cause hence a failure”

“They have a right to protest I have a right to not watch and cancel my NFL package which I have done”

“iIm against it they need to focus on football and not do something that further puts our president in the spotlight they're only rewarding the very person they're trying to speak out against”

UNCLEAR/NO OPINION/MIXED

“Stupid controversy desperate president grasping for distractions”

“I don't believe I could care any less about NFL nor the national anthem and how to listen to it…”

“I am very mixed on this. Part of me thinks it is wrong and getting out of hand that our flag and national anthem represent the freedom we have from sacrifices of those who have fought and died to protect us and that kneeling represents lack of respect, but like it or not the freedom allowed to live in our democracy gives us the right to do things as long as people are not physically hurt or mentally crushed freedom to protest i cannot give better answer”

“There is a political process...this...and Mr President please stop using twitter and calling names that is not appropriate either it all causes strife... players want to make a statement then use the process”

“I am for their freedom of protest I am against using the NFL as a venue of protest leave politics out of the NFL”

“People have the right to express themselves people fought for the right to peacefully protest no one is against the us army or the flag sports and politics shouldn't mix either have players stop coming out of the locker room for the anthem or stop doing it all together at games”

“They certainly have the right to protest however sports does not need to be mixed with politics sports is an escape from that”

“I'm neither for or against the players what i am against is the president and his endless cruel remarks on any subject”

“As long as they decide what to do as a team who cares. Before the year 2000 players were never on the field for it anyway”

“I am a veteran part of me accepts that one of the things I left my family and home to do was to protect others freedom of speech on the other hand I think there are ways of protesting that don't show disrespect to the nation via its symbol the flag that gives you those rights and doesn't serve as a slap in the face to everyone who has saluted it fold it to hand to a devastated family member or had one of those folded flags handed to them”

“I fully support their 1st amendment right to do so and think it is absolutely ridiculous that they are expressing their outrage against a country whose unparalleled and unprecedented levels of personal freedom and protection have made it possible for them to become multi millionaires among 1 of the wealthiest people on earth in their 20s for playing a game the right to free speech means the right to say and support ridiculous things including ridiculously myopic grievances they should try living one month in the life of any ordinary citizen from basically anywhere in the southern hemisphere and see if they ever complain again about life in the united states but go ahead kneel sit lay down stand on your head whatever makes you feel”

SUPPORT

“They began protesting the plight in america of African Americans now the president has forced them to protest him it's not illegal to not stand hand on heart for the american anthem and it is their constitutional right to protest ills in our country any way they choose no one mentions but part of every oath for public office including president say you will defend the constitution the president needs to read it”

“We have freedom of speech period not being able to exercise that makes us no different than Russia or North Korea or others exercising our freedoms should be the highest honor to the military why else have they fought and died plus the flag represents America not the military not veterans the national anthem represents America not just the military and veterans the flag flies over government buildings it's carried by olympic teams it's hung on lawns it's a symbol of America and does not solely belong to patriotism or the military or veterans by requiring them to stand would be forced nationalism and the first step to losing our freedoms that veterans have fought for to require them to stand would be spitting in the face of those who died so that we can be truly free”

“I think they are courageous to use their position to express their concern about inequality in America as both the athletes and many veterans have expressed the kneeling is not about disrespect to the flag or the anthem sad that we must disagree about everything these days it seems that people would rather believe it is an act of disrespect than even try to understand the issue”

“I applaud it you don't have to agree with their stance to be glad to see people exercising their rights to free speech”

“It's an effective public protest against a president that solely focuses on public image at the cost of any substantial or meaningful actions”

“I'm for it but it should be for police brutality against all Americans it is not just blacks that are being harmed”

“It is their freedom of speech if we force people to stand we are no better than North Korea, China or Syria all places that force standing to their pledge”

“I think their stance is admirable and courageous taking a stand for those who have no voice”

“Ok they are like it or not role models and seem to be on justice's side and if the pres would shut up more we would all be better off”

“I am for the nflNFL players taking a knee our flag means nothing if your brother is not included or does not feel included is mistreated or feels mistreated we should address the needs of all citizens and not just a few”

“Only black men with a consistent platform to make a statement regarding racial inequality”

“It's their right this country takes everything too seriously the citizens of this country need to relax”

“Taking a knee is what sports players do to show respect when a fellow player is injured it is another way to show respect and courage”

“They are right to use their position in the spotlight to draw attention to social issues within our society the issues at hand are not about respecting our veterans or the flag itself and we should not be distracted by these arguments”

“You can't demand respect”

“It's their right why are public displays of patriotism necessary in the first place”

 

NOTE: This TextPollTM is a quick non client project intended to demonstrate unstructured data analysis using the OdinText analytics software. That said, results have a confidence interval of +/- 2.5% at the 95% confidence level (greater than the 3 outside polls mentioned at beginning of post). If this had been an actual study we would have recommended looking at data by political affiliation as well as NFL viewing.

About Tom H. C. Anderson Tom H. C. Anderson is the founder and managing partner of OdinText, a venture-backed firm based in Stamford, CT whose patented SaaS analytics platform is used by companies like Disney and Coca-Cola to mine insights from complex, unstructured and mixed data. A recognized authority and pioneer in the field of text analytics with more than two decades of experience in market research, Anderson is the recipient of numerous awards for innovation from industry associations such as CASRO, ESOMAR and the ARF. He was named one of the “Four under 40” market research leaders by the American Marketing Association in 2010. He tweets under the handle @tomhcanderson. Click here to request a demo or additional info.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Labor Day Text Analytics Poll™ Spells Trouble for Labor Unions

Text Analysis Reveals Fragile Positioning of Labor Unions in 2017 America Happy Labor Day to our U.S. OdinText Users and Friends!

Over the holiday weekend we thought we’d run one of our quick Text Analytics Polls™, which highlight how a single open-ended question can be used to very quickly and accurately generate deeper insights on almost any subject compared to conventional multiple-choice surveys (with fewer questions and at comparable speed and cost).

In honor of the holiday, we thought we would ask about labor—specifically organized labor unions. We asked 1,500 Americans: “What are your thoughts and impressions of Workers Unions?” The responses—again, people’s comments in their own words—were rapidly analyzed and quantified using the OdinText advanced analytics software platform and are reported below…

Indifference Even on Labor Day

odintext poll

The results suggest organized labor in America today is precariously positioned, with 60% of respondents indicating they are either indifferent (35%) or outright opposed to labor unions (25%).

The Why’s Behind the Sentiment

Unlike conventional multiple-choice surveys, using unstructured questions and text analytics in polling enables us to not only quantify opinions, but also the reasons behind those opinions.

text poll

Most of those in support of unions don’t feel the need to elaborate much. They simply state that labor unions are a great thing and/or mention that they or a family member belongs to a union. The top reasons provided among supporters is that labor unions are a “necessity” (8.7%) and that they protect workers’ rights (4%).

Interestingly, while those who oppose unions are fewer in number than those who support them (25% vs 40%), their reasons tend to be slightly more articulated, with the most popular being that unions are “no longer useful/necessary” (9.3%), and that they are often “corrupt” (4.1%) and “foster laziness” (3.3%).

Takeaways

Labor unions have been on a gradual decline in the US for some time, and OdinText’s analysis of these comments points to a serious positioning problem, which, if left unaddressed, will probably lead to continued decline and, ultimately, irrelevance.

As many respondents indicated they are indifferent about unions as those who support them.  In politics and in marketing, indifference (or lack of loyalty) can spell death, but it also presents an opportunity to persuade. The question then becomes who has stronger, more cogent messaging in place?

Proponents are not inclined to (or could not) offer much explanation for why they support organized labor; conversely, opponents in their responses tend to offer slightly more detailed explanations, with the most frequent being that labor unions are generally obsolete. The distance between indifference and opposition (“unions are obsolete”) in this case isn’t much. So the challenge facing organized labor in America may be to justify its very existence.

That this result came from a poll conducted over Labor Day weekend, I think, speaks volumes, too.

@TomHCAnderson

PS. If you would like to learn more about how easy, fast and powerful Text Analytics Polling with OdinText can be, feel free to join our live Webinar on the 14th.

PPS. Friendly reminder, today is also the last day for NGMR Award Nominations. Consider nominating a worthy company or colleague here.

*Note: n=1,500 responses were collected  9/1-9/3 2017 via Google Surveys which allow researchers to reach a validated U.S. General Population Representative sample by intercepting people attempting to access high-quality online content. Results are +/- 2.53% accurate at the 95% confidence interval. Data was analyzed using OdinText 9/3/17. Request more info on OdinText here.

 

ABOUT ODINTEXT  The leader in Text Analytics for Marketing Research, OdinText is a patented SaaS (software-as-a-service) platform for natural language processing and text mining. For more information or to request a demo, visit Get The Job Done With OdinText!

New Sentiment Analysis Reveals Reasons Behind Stance on Confederate Statues

Text Analytics Poll™ shows asking respondents to provide reasons for their opinions may increase cognition and decrease “No Opinion”

Asking People WHY They Support/Oppose Civil War Monuments May Affect Results. Judging from the TV news and social media, the entire country is up in arms over the status of Confederate Civil War monuments. What really is the mood of the country in regard to these statues?

A quick Google search turned up the chart below, which to YouGov’s credit broke out not just Democrats VS Republicans, but also blacks VS whites. On a high level this structured survey question, which allowed respondents to answer a standard five-point agreement scale from ‘strongly approve’ to ‘strongly disapprove,’ seems to indicate that “almost half of Americans (48%)” want the Charlottesville Robert E. Lee statue to stay.

While emotions as depicted on TV and social media are running  high, there doesn’t seem to be much reasoned discussion about WHY people feel so strongly on either side. Therefore, we were curious if rather than just asking a closed-ended agreement scale, what would happen instead if respondents were asked to elaborate on their choice with a reason?

Note: the goal here is not to uncover all the best reasons for or against keeping the statues. If that was the case we could approach a handful of social science professors with expertise in history, civil rights or ethics and psychology. Instead, we were curious to see if simply asking someone to consider a reason for their choice (even if they could not give a very good one) would affect the proportions of those agreeing or disagreeing. Of course, we were also curious about how many reasons each side might enumerate and what the quality of those reasons might be.

We asked a random sample of 1,500 Americans the following:

Q. Should Confederate Civil War Monuments be allowed in the US, why or why not?

Asking respondents to provide a reason, and using Text Analytics to measure sentiment, provided an almost identical number in favor of removing Confederate Civil War statues (29%) as the simple Likert scale poll; however, it halved the number of “Don’t Know/Don’t Care” responses (just 10%), apparently to the benefit of those who support keeping Confederate Civil War statues intact (61%).

EMOTIONS VS EXPLICIT REASONS

Let’s have a look at the reasons each side provided…

First, it’s noteworthy but not surprising that a number of the comments registered high emotional valence – especially anger – among both groups. Among those who favor keeping the statues, there is also significantly more fear/anxiety expressed in their comments.

As for the specific reasons, among those who want statues to remain, ‘history’ (implicitly the preservation of) is the most frequently mentioned reason by far (46%), and that history shouldn’t be deleted (3%), and history is both Good and Bad (2%).

The main argument among those who want to remove the statues is that Confederates were losers and traitors (9%) and that these statues should be limited to museums and battle grounds (8%), that glorifying what these men stood for is wrong (6%), as well as more general mentions of its symbolism of hate or slavery (6%).

A QUICK LOOK AT REGION

We took a quick look at answers by geography. Southerners were 5% more likely than total to mention the historic importance of the statues (35% VS 30% in total). They were also half as likely to have made the argument that statues for losers/traitors aren’t appropriate (1.7% VS 2.8% in total).

Americans in the Northeast region were significantly more likely than average to say they weren’t sure or didn’t care (7% VS 5% in total), and were also significantly more likely to mention the importance of “remembering” (3% VS 1% in total).

Americans in the West Region were significantly less likely to mention the importance of ‘History’ (25% VS 30% in Total).

The Verdict Changes When Asked Why

The court of public opinion in a standard Likert scale instrument appears fairly evenly split on whether or not to remover Confederate Civil War monuments, but when we ask people to explain why they hold a position on this matter in their own words, we see a significant shift in the data toward keeping these monuments intact.

Most respondents didn’t offer any surprises in terms of their explanations for why they support/oppose keeping the monuments. Indeed, a few arguments on both sides have already been fleshed out in the media, and this may have affected how people responded.

The ah-ha for us in this exercise was that the “don’t care/don’t knows” shrank by half when respondents were asked to provide a reason for their opinion. Whether this is a matter of causality, of course, is debatable. But it does suggest that allowing people to explain in their own words will produce a different, possibly more accurate picture, as well as which reasons have strongest appeal.

@TomHCAnderson

*Note: n=1,500 responses were collected via Google Surveys 8/19-8/21 2017. Google Surveys allow researchers to reach a validated U.S. General Population Representative sample by intercepting people attempting to access high-quality online content or who have downloaded the Google Opinion Rewards mobile app. Results are +/- 2.53% accurate at the 95% confidence interval. Data was analyzed using OdinText 8/21/17. Request more info on OdinText here.

About Tom H. C. Anderson Tom H. C. Anderson is the founder and managing partner of OdinText, a venture-backed firm based in Stamford, CT whose eponymous, patented SAS platform is used by Fortune 500 companies like Disney, Coca-Cola and Shell Oil to mine insights from complex, unstructured and mixed data. A recognized authority and pioneer in the field of text analytics with more than two decades of experience in market research, Anderson is the recipient of numerous awards for innovation from industry associations such as CASRO, ESOMAR and the ARF. He was named one of the “Four under 40” market research leaders by the American Marketing Association in 2010. He tweets under the handle @tomhcanderson.

How Fear of Frexit Helped Macron Win the French Presidential Election
NEW Text Analytics PollTM Shows a Trump-Style Le Pen Upset May Have Been Averted by Overwhelming Opposition to a Frexit

Last week on this blog, I reported findings from a Text Analytics Poll™ of 3,000 French citizens showing that Marine Le Pen’s positioning going into the runoff looked remarkably similar to that of another recent underdog candidate, Donald Trump, just days before his stunning U.S. election upset.

Indeed, a similar set of circumstances appeared to be in play, as noted by the New York Times in an article on Election Day: “Populist anger at the political establishment; economic insecurity among middle class voters; public alienation toward mainstream political parties; rising resentment toward immigrants.”

Yet on Sunday, the French people elected Emmanuel Macron president over Le Pen by about 66/34. So why wasn’t the race closer?

The answer may be in data we collected from French and British respondents, which shows that the prospect of a Le Pen “Frexit” probably figured highly in Macron’s victory.

Positioning: Voting Against a Candidate

Our data in the French presidential poll were eerily reminiscent of data we collected prior to the U.S. election, which suggested a victory may not so much amount to an endorsement of one candidate as a rejection of the other.

Our analysis showed that first and foremost, the French associated Le Pen with bigotry and hatemongering, but text analysis also showed that among the French she was strongly positioned around immigration reform and putting France first—a platform that worked effectively for Trump, who had also been labeled a bigot in the minds of many Americans. In fact, the perception of Trump as a bigot was only slightly lower among Americans than the perception of Le Pen as a bigot among the French (11% vs 15%, respectively).

In contrast, respondents most frequently associated Macron with “liberalism”—meaning economic liberalism favoring free markets—followed by capitalism, neither of which is necessarily an asset in terms of positioning in French politics, particularly for a wealthy investment banker at a time when job security is a major concern among middleclass voters.

But the main platform issue that people associated with Macron—which trailed just behind people’s view of him as a proponent of free markets/capitalism—was Europe/EU, in stark contrast to Le Pen, who was well known to strongly favor an EU “Frexit.” The EU is also synonymous with the free movement of commerce and people, which, of course, stands in contrast to the dual protectionist/anti-immigration platform championed by Le Pen.

This, naturally, begged the question: How important is EU membership to the French population?

If the mood of the French electorate were anything like that of British Brexit voters, then favoring EU membership could be a liability. So just days ahead of the election we ran a second Text Analytics Poll—once again a single question—only this time we polled 3000 voters each in France and the UK:

  1. “What does the European Union mean to you?” (or “Qu'est ce que l'Union Européenne représente pour vous?” in French).

EU Membership Means “Hope”

It’s worth noting that turnout for this election was reportedly the lowest in 36 years. These were presumably voters who never would’ve cast a ballot for Le Pen, but who also could not be mobilized for Macron. In short, they were Macron’s to lose.

This new poll data helps explain why, in spite of inspiring lackluster confidence and support from anti-Le Pen voters, Macron nonetheless won the election by a sizable margin.

EU UK V FRANCE

While a significant number of the French tell us the EU means nothing to them, this is significantly lower than the Brits who say so.

Conversely, the French are more than five times as likely as Brits to say the EU means “Everything/A Lot” to them. The French are also far less likely than their UK counterparts to criticize the EU for corruption, wastefulness and such.

Instead, the French are extremely optimistic about the EU, with many indicating it provides “future hope” and keeps them out of wars and at “Peace” —something Brits are more likely to attribute to NATO.

High Positive Emotions for EU

Ultimately, emotions are what really drive behavior, and in the end, the French electorate’s highly positive emotional disposition toward the EU—notably their “Anticipation” and hopefulness—may have countered Macron’s relatively weak positioning in this election.

eMOTIONS TOWARD EU 2

Closing Thoughts

I read some responses to our original analysis that I’d characterize as emotionally overwrought. I understand that this is an occupational hazard for anyone conducting political opinion research, but our duty is to present and report objectively what the data tells us—even if what we’re seeing in the data isn’t necessarily pleasant.

The job of these polls was to assess the candidates’ brand positioning in the minds of voters, and to review the potential opportunities and threats in the “marketplace” as we would for any brand.

I want to stress that I am not discounting people’s distaste for Marine Le Pen’s perceived bigotry as being a key factor behind her loss in this election, but I’ll emphasize again that it was only slightly higher (15% vs 11%) than what we saw for Donald Trump, who, as you know, is now the President of the United States.

And at the end of the day, the hard truth is that more than a third of those who voted in this election voted for a right-wing nationalist—a candidate whose background makes Donald Trump look like a civil rights activist by comparison. Moreover, 25% of the electorate were not sufficiently affronted by Madame Le Pen’s politics to at least vote against her by voting for Macron; instead, they just abstained.

Like many people, I am relieved by the outcome of this election, but it seems clear from the positioning of both candidates—as reported by French citizens, unaided, in their own words—and the data on EU membership from our second poll that the French people did not simply reject Marine Le Pen because she is positioned as a racist/hatemonger; she was on the wrong side of Frexit.

@TomHCAnderson

*Note: n=3,000 responses were collected via Google Surveys 3/3-5/5 2017. Google Surveys allow researchers to reach a validated French General Population Representative sample by intercepting people attempting to access high-quality online content or who have downloaded the Google Opinion Rewards mobile app. Results are +/- 2.51% accurate at the 95% confidence interval.

Text Analytics Tips

About Tom H. C. Anderson Tom H. C. Anderson is the founder and managing partner of OdinText, a venture-backed firm based in Stamford, CT whose eponymous, patented SAS platform is used by Fortune 500 companies like Disney, Coca-Cola and Shell Oil to mine insights from complex, unstructured and mixed data. A recognized authority and pioneer in the field of text analytics with more than two decades of experience in market research, Anderson is the recipient of numerous awards for innovation from industry associations such as CASRO, ESOMAR and the ARF. He was named one of the “Four under 40” market research leaders by the American Marketing Association in 2010. He tweets under the handle @tomhcanderson.