Posts tagged Text Analytics Software
OdinText Names Andy Greenawalt CEO
Andy Greenawalt to lead OdinText accelerated growth phase

We are happy to announce serial Inc. 500 entrepreneur Andy Greenawalt as CEO effective June 1. OdinText founder and current CEO Tom H.C. Anderson will transition to the roles of Chief Research Officer and Chairman.

Andy Greenawalt

An accomplished tech entrepreneur and leader, Greenawalt has successfully built two Inc. 500 SaaS (software as a service) businesses. Most recently, he was CEO of Continuity, a pioneer in the Regulatory Technology industry, and he remains chairman of its board. Prior to Continuity, Greenawalt founded Perimeter eSecurity, now part of BAE Systems, serving as CEO and CTO and on its board. He is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst with a degree in Philosophy and Cognitive Linguistics.

“With more Fortune 500 companies choosing OdinText, Andy Greenawalt’s credentials in innovation, his successful record of building SaaS businesses, and his singular focus on creating customer value make him a perfect fit to lead OdinText through its next phase of growth,” said Anderson.

“OdinText is a truly rare startup with Fortune 500 enterprise customers —  the most sophisticated buyers in the world,” said Greenawalt. “This is a testament to the vision and team that Tom Anderson has assembled and it’s a great position to be starting from as a pioneer in the text analytics market. The company is very well positioned to bring a new platform to bear and serve as a cornerstone to the smart enterprise of the future.”

Alison Malloy, the lead investor in OdinText from Connecticut Innovations, stated, “Connecticut Innovations has worked with Andy Greenawalt for 20 years. We have absolute confidence that he’s the right person to realize the market potential of OdinText — which has pioneered the next generation of text analytics — allowing Tom Anderson to focus on the research needed to continue to develop and lead the market with industry-leading products.”

“OdinText has developed patented IP, raised pre-seed funding and created an MVP product,” Greenawalt said. “OdinText is a transformative solution that is now poised to redefine how businesses improve satisfaction, retention and revenue. We expect to grow dramatically.”

Leif Erikson + Text Analytics: What’s the Connection?

What Data Explorers and Researchers Can Learn from Leif Erikson and Norse Mythology You may or may not be aware that Leif Erikson Day will be observed in the U.S. this October 9th. The holiday commemorates the discovery of North America by the Norwegian explorer for whom it’s named (long before Christopher Columbus took his voyage).

In Leif’s honor and the spirit of exploration, I thought this would be a good opportunity to indulge in two subjects near and dear to my heart: Norse mythology and text analytics.

Now you’re probably wondering what possible connection Norse mythology could have with text analytics. The answer lies in the name OdinText.

To my dismay, I’ve come to realize that very few people outside of Scandinavia and Germany share my enthusiasm for Norse mythology. And not infrequently I get asked what our name is all about.

So today I’m going to explain the connection for the edification and enlightenment of all!

odintexta

Odin: The One-Eyed God of Wisdom

OdinText derives its name from the Norse god, Odin, a figure similar in respects to the Greek god Zeus in that he’s something of a patriarch to a brood of other ancient deities.

Like his Greek counterpart, Odin is associated with specific human attributes and phenomena, chiefly battle and wisdom. It’s the latter quality that inspired us to adopt Odin’s name.

Legend has it that Odin—who is always depicted as missing an eye—sacrificed his eye in exchange for the “Wisdom of Ages.”

He is also said to have been attended by two ravens—Huginn (translation: “thought”) and Muninn (“memory” or “mind”)—who scoured the world each day for news and information and then reported it back to Odin each night.

Finally, Odin is credited with creating the runic alphabet, which until it was supplanted by Latin around 700 AD, was the source of text for many Germanic languages.

odintextravens3

Two Ravens and Breakthrough Insights

The notion of Odin’s two intelligence-gathering ravens appeals to me as a metaphor for what I believe is the ultimate application of text analytics: to answer questions we don’t know to ask.

Of course, text analytics are perfectly suited to answer any questions we can think to pose, but in today’s uncertain and rapidly changing environment, insight that leads to true competitive advantage often lies in the questions we don’t know to ask.

You may be familiar with the term “dark data,” for example, which was originally defined by Gartner as all of the data organizations collect in their daily operations that goes unexploited. That definition has now been expanded to include the ocean of data being generated by people every day, more than 80% of which is text-based.

Today, thanks to software like OdinText, we have the opportunity to scour and mine these oceans of text data for what we don’t know we don’t know. I’m talking about genuine, breakthrough insights, the sort that are discovered and not the product of a precision hunt.

So in celebration of Leif Erikson, the explorer, I urge you to join me in pursuit of discovering the unknown. You already have the data. Let’s put it to use.

You’ll be happy to know that unlike our friend, Odin, you won’t need to give an eye to acquire this knowledge. Just an hour of training.

Contact us for an OdinText demo today!

Yours faithfully,

Tom

TOM DEC 300X250 Tom H. C. Anderson OdinText Inc. www.odintext.com 888.891.3115 x 701

ABOUT ODINTEXT OdinText is a patented SaaS (software-as-a-service) platform for natural language processing and advanced text analysis. Fortune 500 companies such as Disney and Shell Oil use OdinText to mine insights from complex, unstructured text data. The technology is available through the venture-backed Stamford, CT firm of the same name founded by CEO Tom H. C. Anderson, a recognized authority and pioneer in the field of text analytics with more than two decades of experience in market research. Anderson is the recipient of numerous awards for innovation from industry associations such as ESOMAR, CASRO, the ARF and the American Marketing Association. He tweets under the handle @tomhcanderson.

You Asked for It. Here’s a Chance to Learn More about Our International Culture Poll…

It’s True: You Only Need One Open-Ended Question and Language Doesn’t Matter!

First of all, thank you all so much for the incredible response to this week’s multi-country, multilingual Text Analytics Poll!

I’ve received a flood of email and calls for additional information and I’m always happy to share, so if you have questions or want to geek out with me, please feel free to contact me on our website, LinkedIn or Twitter.

While so many of you thought the findings of our poll were remarkable, I was pleased that the implications for researchers weren’t lost on anyone, notably:

  • A single analyst, speaking English only, can today analyze data in eight different languages,

and

  • In an age of steeply declining response rates, one can gather deep insights on a multi-dimensional subject with just a single question!

This analysis of more than 15, 500 text comments spanning 11 cultures, 10 countries and eight languages really showcased the power and practicality of modern text analytics.

So much so, in fact, that I am delighted to announce that I’ve been invited by the Insights Association to present on this topic at their inaugural analytics conference, NEXT: Advancing Insights Through Innovation & Research, May 9-10 in New York.

For what it’s worth, I really got a lot out of attending the Insights Association’s CEO conference earlier this year (I blogged about it here).

Anyone interested in conducting international, multilingual research on the scale of our poll this week easily, quickly and affordably will not want to miss my presentation. Please feel free to use my speaker code [NEXTTA15] to register at a 15% discount.

If you won’t be able to attend NEXT, or you can’t wait until May to learn more about what OdinText can do for YOU, please request additional info or a demo here.

Thanks again for your readership, support and interest in what we are doing!

@TomHCAnderson

About Tom H. C. Anderson

Tom H. C. Anderson is the founder and managing partner of OdinText, a venture-backed firm based in Stamford, CT whose eponymous, patented SAS platform is used by Fortune 500 companies like Disney, Coca-Cola and Shell Oil to mine insights from complex, unstructured and mixed data. A recognized authority and pioneer in the field of text analytics with more than two decades of experience in market research, Anderson is the recipient of numerous awards for innovation from industry associations such as CASRO, ESOMAR and the ARF. He was named one of the "Four under 40" market research leaders by the American Marketing Association in 2010. He tweets under the handle @tomhcanderson.

Text Analytics Identifies Globalization Impact on Culture

International Text Analytics Poll™ Explores 11 Cultures in 10 Countries and 8 Languages! [Part I]

When pundits declare that the western world is  now in the throes of a globalization “backlash,” they’re generally referring to the reversal of decades of economic and trade policy, things like Brexit.

But what of other concerns typically associated with globalization? What about culture?

Specifically, there are those who argue that globalization will mean the end of cultures, that the various cultures of the world will over time dilute and blend until there is ultimately just one global melting pot culture.

They may be right.

When we think about culture, it’s often in terms of food, music, customs, etc., but it turns out that when you ask people in countries around the world to describe their own culture in their own words, one nearly universal and unexpected attribute rises to the top: diversity/multiculturalism.

In fact, multiculturalism/diversity was one of the primary and most frequently mentioned attributes used by over 15,500 people to describe 11 different cultures across 10 countries and eight languages!

Text Analytics on a Massive, Multilingual International Scale

Last week on this blog, we published the results of a Text Analytics Poll™ for the favorite movie of all time across six countries and five languages. The project generated a flood of inquiries.

Since everyone is so interested in what can be accomplished on an international scale, we increased the scope of this project significantly.

This time, we asked more than 15,500 people (at least n=1,500 per country) in 10 countries and eight languages the following:

“How would you explain <insert country> culture to someone who isn’t at all familiar with it?”

Then we ran their comments through OdinText, which identified the top 200 cultural markers or features from more than 15,500 text comments and also analyzed those comments for significant patterns of emotion.

How We Translated AND Analyzed the Data (In Less Than Two Hours)

Author’s note: If you’re not interested in methodology, please feel free to skip ahead to the results down below!

Many of you contacted us asking for more details last week, so I’ve provided some additional nuts and bolts here…

Step 1: Data Prep (Translation)

I usually limit total analytical time for any of these Text Analytics Poll™ projects to fewer than two hours. I admit that’s going to be a challenge today, as I’m looking at more than 15,500 comments across 11 cultures from 10 countries in eight languages.

The first challenge is translation. I happen to speak a few languages in addition to English, but in this case I’m faced with seven languages that I don’t understand well enough to analyze. If I did understand each of the languages, or were working with analysts who did, we could easily conduct the analysis in OdinText in the native form.

I’ll point out that while some corporations claim to be “global” in everything they do, in reality there is never enough language fluency at corporate to handle this type of analysis, so analyses are typically divvied up and entrusted to local divisions—a time-consuming and imperfect task, especially when the goal in this case is to make head-to-head comparisons across these countries.

Therefore translation is necessary. While less precise than human translation, machine translation lends itself quite well to a project like this and is more than sufficient for OdinText to identify patterns and even to determine which quotes should be of interest. Nothing has a better ROI. Case in point, it took two minutes to translate the data. For those keeping track, I’m at

Above we have an example of machine translated raw data vs. the original French from the multi-country movie analysis I conducted last week. In the case above I’m looking at all mentions of “La Ligne Verte,” a title OdinText identified as appearing frequently among comments from French respondents. I don’t speak French, so I prefer to work with machine translated data on the left, which translated “La Ligne Verte” literally to “The Green Line” –the French title for the U.S. movie “The Green Mile.”

Step 2: Topic Identification

Using the top-down/bottom-up approach we teach in OdinText training and which we’ve blogged about here before, we identify 200 or so topics/features for analysis. This is a semi-supervised approach, and so a human is involved.

Given this somewhat larger multi-country data set, I allowed about 45 minutes for this task, so we’re at 

Step 3: Artificial Intelligence and Structuring the Analysis

Structuring the analysis is the most important and the most difficult part of any project, especially an exploratory mission where you don’t know what you are looking for at the outset.

You may be surprised to know that artificial intelligence and advanced machine learning algorithms can be a lot less useful than one might think. They have a tendency to identify the obvious—the attribute/topic “tradition” in this case—or, in cases, the unexplainable. For instance, terms like “French,” “American,” “Japanese,” “Spanish,” etc., came up in responses to our question. These are, of course, very useful if you’re building an algorithm to predict where comments originate, for example, but they aren’t terribly illuminating for us here.

Examples of other topics auto identified as ‘of interest’ by our AI include “friendliness,” “relaxed/laid back,” “freedom,” and “equality fraternity liberty.” (You can probably guess where that last one came from.) Some of these other, less expected ones warrant a closer look and will be included in the analysis.

We could move right into an exhaustive analysis of each country, but I’m looking to quickly find any interesting patterns in this data, so I elect to use a quick visualization first.

Cultural Differences and Similarities Vizualized

Cultural Differences and Similarities Vizualized (A Few Key Descriptive Dimensions Added)

These visualizations (above) plot cultures that were described in more similar terms by people closer together and those that were described more differently further apart, yielding some interesting patterns. The USA, UK, Brazil, France and even Spain look quite similar. Two countries—Germany and Japan—cluster slightly away from this main bunch, but very close to each other. Then there are those that appear to be most dissimilar from the rest—Mexico, French- and English-speaking Canada, respectively, and Australia.

To my earlier question about whether or not globalization is having a homogenizing effect on cultures, it would appear so at a glance. We’ve noted that several countries cluster closely around the U.S. But look again—the U.S. appears to occupy the center of the cultural universe here! That’s no coincidence, I suspect, as U.S. culture could in many ways be considered the “melting pot” model and, as we saw last week, culture is a major U.S. export.

Analytical time to review multiple visualizations and decide that this is a repeating pattern was 10 minutes. Total analytical time =

Given that we have a full hour left (remember I did not want to spend more than two hours on this analysis), as a next step we conducted a little bottom-up work to look at what makes each country unique from the international aggregate/total and to see whether the pattern in the visualization makes sense.

Example: Why do Germany and Japan look so similar to OdinText?

A glance at the two charts below shows significant differences between how the Japanese and Germans describe their cultures. For instance, the Japanese were 11 times more likely than Germans to say their culture was something that needed to be experienced in order to be understood, and they were four times more likely than Germans to mention their history. They were also 14 times less likely to mention certain places of interest and three times more likely than Germans to mention food.

In contrast, Germans were 27 times more likely to mention beer and eight times more likely to describe their culture as rule-abiding and orderly. (Of course, this does not mean that Japanese culture is any less rule-abiding or orderly; rather, it suggests that for the Japanese these are not defining cultural characteristics.)

Respondents from both countries were more likely than average to mention language, tradition, and politeness, BUT the similarities between these two cultures actually lie primarily in the extent to which they both differ from the other cultures sampled, notably by how infrequently certain features mentioned by people from other cultures appeared in comments from German and Japanese respondents.Total Analytical Time =

This concludes Part 1 of our cultural safari. In Part 2 tomorrow we’ll take a deeper dive into each of the 11 cultures in our study individually, exploring how their members define themselves and the extent to which key cultural drivers differ from or are similar to the international aggregrate. Stay tuned!

Tomorrow: Part II – Key Cultural Drivers in Their Own Words

@TomHCAnderson - @OdinText

PS. Have questions about today's post? Feel free to post a comment or request more info here.

About Tom H. C. Anderson

Tom H. C. Anderson is the founder and managing partner of OdinText, a venture-backed firm based in Stamford, CT whose eponymous, patented SAS platform is used by Fortune 500 companies like Disney, Coca-Cola and Shell Oil to mine insights from complex, unstructured and mixed data. A recognized authority and pioneer in the field of text analytics with more than two decades of experience in market research, Anderson is the recipient of numerous awards for innovation from industry associations such as CASRO, ESOMAR and the ARF. He was named one of the "Four under 40" market research leaders by the American Marketing Association in 2010. He he tweets under the handle @tomhcanderson.

 

Shop Talk on Research Trends: Our Interview with the Industry’s Top Pundit!

GreenBook Interview Covers Partnering, AI/Machine Learning and the Latest Insights Applications for Text Analytics “We should be less worried about each other and more worried about the potential new entrants to this industry.”

That’s what I told GreenBook Blog Editor & Chief Leonard Murphy in an interview recently when he asked me about the trend toward partnering and collaboration between research providers.

It’s not often that one gets to talk shop at length with the industry’s top pundit, so Tim Lynch and I were delighted when Lenny invited us for a frank and broad-based discussion that covered some important ground, including:

  • Why partnering and collaboration among research companies is becoming a critically important factor in today’s marketplace;
  • What the buzz around AI and machine learning is really about and what researchers need to know;
  • How text analytics are being deployed in powerful and novel ways to produce insights that either were not accessible or couldn’t be obtained practically in the past.

Check out Lenny’s post about it here and have a look at the interview below:

 

Special thanks again to Lenny Murphy for a great interview and for your efforts to keep us all informed and to help us get better at what we do!

@TomHCAnderson  - @OdinText

P.S. Want to know more about anything we covered in the interview? Contact us here.

 

About Tom H. C. Anderson

Tom H. C. Anderson is the founder and managing partner of OdinText, a venture-backed firm based in Stamford, CT whose eponymous, patented SAS platform is used by Fortune 500 companies like Disney, Coca-Cola and Shell Oil to mine insights from complex, unstructured and mixed data. A recognized authority and pioneer in the field of text analytics with more than two decades of experience in market research, Anderson is the recipient of numerous awards for innovation from industry associations such as CASRO, ESOMAR and the ARF. He was named one of the "Four under 40" market research leaders by the American Marketing Association in 2010. He tweets under the handle @tomhcanderson.

 

Text Analytics Poll: Why We Unfriend on Facebook

You Can't Handle the Truth (and Other Top Reasons for Being Unfriended on Facebook)  When’s the last time you unfriended someone on Facebook?

In spite of the fact that both the platform and its users have reached what in product lifecycle-speak would be called maturity, unfriending remains a somewhat surprisingly common phenomenon.

In fact, about 76% of Facebook users we contacted in a recent Text Analytics Poll™ told us they had unfriended someone .

The drivers behind “unfriending” have been researched and written about extensively, but given its enduring prevalence, we wanted to explore why it persists. So we asked a random gen pop sample of people (n=1500) the following:

“Have you unfriended someone on Facebook, and if so why?”

A brief note about this Text Analytics Poll™…

Before we share the results, I must emphasize that this is a quick, surface-level read. The goal of these Text Analytics Polls™ is not to conduct a perfect study, but to very quickly design and field a survey with only one open-ended question, analyze the results with OdinText, and report the findings here on this blog.

Yes, I know that not everyone is a Facebook user, and the response data reflected this. More importantly, there is without a doubt overlap among the categories that came out of OdinText’s analysis in the chart below.  For example, a number of people reported they had unfriended someone because they had stopped speaking to him/her. The reason they stopped speaking to this person could be due to a break-up, political differences or one of the other reasons cited by other respondents.

The point here is that people are responding off the top of their heads and in their own words, providing a much more accurate understanding of the “what” being explored, which we can then analyze and quantify using OdinText software.

Now for the results…

Top Reasons for Unfriending Someone on Facebook

Note: All Verbatims are [sic]

  1. Inappropriate/Offensive Content

You’d think most people would’ve learned appropriate Facebook etiquette by now, but clearly there are a significant number of bad actors out there, with the primary reason for unfriending being related to inappropriate or offensive content. This category spanned everything from profanity to racism to graphic sexual content, but also lifestyle choices or social views that people found personally objectionable.

Examples:

they posted things that are illegal and go against my morals

vulgarities

R-rated content

Posts about lifestyle choice that I am against and profanity

constant postings of very controversial subjects such as abortion

racism or derogatory remarks about ladies

For posting an extremely offensive video featuring meth being smoked by young girls

  1. No Longer Friends/Grew Apart/Tired of Them

Too much drama or TMI, the airing of dirty laundry, posts that made people uncomfortable because they were too personal or too often about deeply sensitive subjects…these were common reasons cited for severing ties on Facebook. But people also said the relationship had grown stale or they’d lost touch. Sure people change. Relationships grow stale. Sometimes we outgrow one another. These are common occurrences in real life, but I was surprised to see such a high incidence of them on Facebook, where one’s “friends” are frequently not people with whom we share close personal relationships.

Examples:

people who I fell out of contact with and felt it wouldn't be worth reconnecting with; people who I wasn't very fond of to begin with; people who were friended as a means to an end i.e. for an old job; people who I started out having a good friendship with and ended up being jerks.

because the friendship ended.

they were two-faced

No longer keep in touch

They changed as a person

I haven't seen them in years, and they tried to add me to a group about them selling Tupperware.

I had not seen or talked to them in months or years

They were posting too much personal drama

No longer friends with that person and couldn’t stand their drama anymore

They enjoyed high drama, public arguments with their families.

  1. Politics

Everyone knew this one was coming. We were surprised it wasn’t number one, especially given the particularly divisive presidential election that just took place. I expect the incidence of politics being a driver for unfriending is actually higher than people’s comments reflected. This is also an area where the comments were highly emotionally charged.

Interestingly, most people who cited politics as a reason for unfriending did not elaborate. The comment data suggest that a lot of people simply don’t care for political ranting, in general. It’s probably safe to assume that the rules that govern polite conversation in person also apply on Facebook.

That said, significant numbers of people did specify whether the politics of the unfriended were liberal or conservative. But interestingly, mentions of Donald Trump specifically were more than sufficient to merit their own category.

  1. Annoying Statuses

This one’s pretty self-explanatory: status updates—especially the inane and/or frequent variety—tend to irk people!

Examples:

posted too many annoying statuses

Annoying posts that clutter the newsfeed

Because their posts were too frequent and annoying.

To stop the annoying posts

Annoying statuses

they either post way too much or their posts are stupid and I do not want to look at them

Tired of the persons constant posts about their hair or personal injuries from others

  1. Don’t Know Well or In Real Life

Early on in our Facebook lives, most of us were probably a bit promiscuous when it came to “friending” and, consequently, we had to cull the herd. What’s surprising is how many people still accept friends they don’t know and then “unfriend” them because…well…they don’t know them.

Did not feel comfortable with them knowing personal details about me

Didn't remember who they were.

I never knew them very well and they were cluttering my feed.

To purge people that I have no connection to

Because i didnt actually know them in real life.

Inactive, wasn't a close friend to begin with.

Because I did not speak to them ever

Because they were a mere acquaintance

cuz dont know the person

Bonus: Why We Think They Unfriended Us

It seems that while many of the norms and conditions for friendship (or at least friendly acquaintanceship) in real life also apply on Facebook, a lot of people either do not understand them or insist on breaking them when they’re on the other side of a screen.

But how do we account for those rare instances when someone unfriends us? Well, we asked another gen pop sample if they had been unfriended and, if so, for what reason.

Not surprisingly, it turns out we are almost 10 times more likely to say we unfriended someone because they were annoying or inappropriate as we are to admit that was the reason we ourselves were unfriended.

Most of the people who were unfriended by someone else told us they’re not quite sure why, but they often hazarded what appear to be pretty good “guesses”:

Yes, but I was not told why. Person has had a lot of stress in the community, can only guess it was just too much to continue.

I would guess that it would be because we don't keep in contact.

They did not like my ‘opinion’ which is fine because it was my ‘opinion’ not theirs. Guess they should not have asked.

Because of a joke that I made too soon after the Orlando shootings. I made a picture of Lando Calrissian holding a pride flag and the caption said ‘we are Lando?’ too soon I guess

People also tend to be rather defensive about being unfriended and are significantly more likely to just chalk it up to “a difference of opinion,” noting that they “don’t really care anyway” and that it’s probably because “we aren’t really close enough anymore.”

Finally, many of us say we were unfriended for “speaking the truth.”

Thanks for reading. Now what do you think?

@TomHCAnderson

PS. Do you have an idea for our next Text Analytics Poll™? We’d love to hear from you! Please contact us here for more info or to request an OdinText demo with your data.

About Tom H. C. Anderson

Tom H. C. Anderson is the founder and managing partner of OdinText, a venture-backed firm based in Stamford, CT whose eponymous, patented SAS platform is used by Fortune 500 companies like Disney, Coca-Cola and Shell Oil to mine insights from complex, unstructured and mixed data. A recognized authority and pioneer in the field of text analytics with more than two decades of experience in market research, Anderson is the recipient of numerous awards for innovation from industry associations such as CASRO, ESOMAR and the ARF. He was named one of the "Four under 40" market research leaders by the American Marketing Association in 2010. He tweets under the handle @tomhcanderson.

Mush Aside, Top Things that Bug Us about Our Sweethearts

Valentine’s Day Text Analytics Poll™ Uncovers What People Really Think about their Special Someones Ah, February 14th—the one day of the year when anything you want to eat comes shaped in a heart!

Yes, love is in the air today, friends. We show it with cards and candy, roses and Build-a-Bears, theater tickets, dinner reservations and sexy unmentionables…

On Valentine’s Day we express our true feelings for that special someone!

Well, maybe we profess our love, at least. But what do we hold back?

The truth is, anyone who’s been in one can tell you that relationships aren’t all sweet nothings and love songs. (Except mine. My wife is a reader. I love you, honey! You’re perfect!)

So, at the risk of cynicism on the ultimate Hallmark holiday, we decided to get a little real here with some help from OdinText. We asked each of three randomly-selected gen pop samples of 1,500 a question designed to give us the good, bad or the ugly about their sweethearts—stuff you might not find in a card store.

What Irks Me about You

I love being married. It's so great to find one special person you want to annoy for the rest of your life. — Rita Rudner 

We asked 1,500 Americans to reply to the following question in their own words in a comment box:

“What do you like least about your significant other?”

Omitting a significant number of liars and honeymooners who said “nothing,” here are the responses after running all 1,500 comments through OdinText…

Ok, who did not predict “hair” would be the number three response? Especially against common relationship problems like money/financial issues and lack of communication (which came out relatively low)?

What I Bring to this Relationship

My friends tell me I have an intimacy problem. But they don't really know me.  — Garry Shandling

Valentine’s Day is all about appreciating the way our sweethearts enrich our lives, but we all like to think we have something special to offer in return.

We asked people one of two questions:

  1. “How would your significant other describe you to a good friend?”

Or

  1. “How would you describe your significant other to a good friend?”

Here’s what they told us, with responses to question 1 in white and question 2 in red:

As you can see from the results, it appears a lot of us consider our sweethearts to be our best friends and we value them for their love and support. But we’re twice as likely to describe ourselves as being the funny one in the relationship (and the crazy one, too).

Life is Lonely without You

If we take matrimony at its lowest, we regard it as a sort of friendship recognized by the police. —Robert Louis Stevenson

They say distance makes the heart grow fonder, so we asked people this:

“If you were without your significant other for an entire week, what things would you miss the most?”

And there you have it. I think the responses to this question show overwhelmingly why our sweethearts put up with so much from us.

Wishing you and your special someone a lovely Valentine’s Day!

And for you single folks out there, take heart: You’re not only saving money today; you’re not shackled to a snoring, messy, flatulent sweetheart with a bad attitude.

@TomHCanderson

PS. Could a Text Analytics Poll™ answer your burning marketing questions?  Contact us to see if a single-question open-ended survey makes sense for you! Using OdinText is easy.

About Tom H. C. Anderson

Tom H. C. Anderson is the founder and managing partner of OdinText, a venture-backed firm based in Stamford, CT whose eponymous, patented SAS platform is used by Fortune 500 companies like Disney, Coca-Cola and Shell Oil to mine insights from complex, unstructured and mixed data. A recognized authority and pioneer in the field of text analytics with more than two decades of experience in market research, Anderson is the recipient of numerous awards for innovation from industry associations such as CASRO, ESOMAR and the ARF. He was named one of the "Four under 40" market research leaders by the American Marketing Association in 2010. He tweets under the handle @tomhcanderson.

The Hidden Cost of Big-Ticket Text Analytics: Time

How Messy Multi Departmental Procurement and Lengthy Implementation Stall Text Analytics Insights The inspiration for this week’s clip in our “Get the Job Done!” series is the big-ticket procurement and implementation process—and all of those folks whose opinions you don’t need.

Take a look:

We hear all the time from prospective clients who’ve found themselves bogged down in the painful, protracted process of getting buy-in for enterprise text analytics platforms that offer something for everyone and come with a six-figure price tag.

Oftentimes, this procurement process involves people in the organization who have lots of opinions but no research expertise and who, in cases, won’t even be using the purchase in question.

Worse yet, after everyone has had his/her say and the purchase has finally gone through, the original intended user finds the whole initiative mired in a lengthy, complicated implementation!

Six months in, they find themselves stuck in more meetings, investing even more precious time building custom, static ontologies that will require ongoing updates, maintenance and even more time down the road…

It’s 2017 and the one thing no one can afford to waste is time.

If you’re looking for a combination of analytics firepower, scalability, and ease of implementation and use, OdinText is unrivaled:

  • One hour of training

  • No customization or ongoing updates necessary

  • Scales to meet the needs of any organization, regardless of size

  • Handles any data set—Big or Small

  • State-of-the-art analytics sophistication

  • Affordable enough not to need a procurement committee

Ask yourself how you’d like to spend the new year. More meetings?

Don’t let other departments, procurement and a lengthy implementation process hijack your text analytics work. Get the job done now!

Contact us today to arrange a demo using your own data and find out how your organization can be up and running text analytics right away.

@TomHCAnderson

Tom H. C. Anderson

OdinText Inc. www.odintext.com

ABOUT ODINTEXT

OdinText is a patented SaaS (software-as-a-service) platform for advanced analytics. Fortune 500 companies such as Disney and Shell Oil use OdinText to mine insights from complex, unstructured text data. The technology is available through the venture-backed Stamford, CT firm of the same name founded by CEO Tom H. C. Anderson, a recognized authority and pioneer in the field of text analytics with more than two decades of experience in market research. Anderson is the recipient of numerous awards for innovation from industry associations such as ESOMAR, CASRO, the ARF and the American Marketing Association. He tweets under the handle @tomhcanderson.

Why You Don’t Need a Lumberjack in a Tutu

How to Get Bogged Down with Clarabridge in 2017  

I don’t know if he’s actually a lumberjack, but the man in the video is definitely not a ballerina.

It’s obvious to most that slapping a tutu on someone big and ungainly does not make him a dancer. Yet I see other text analytics software providers attempting to effect a similar illusion all the time.

Take Clarabridge, for example. (I’m not picking on them, but they are the largest player in the market.)

Clarabridge stuffs all sorts of unnecessary features and fancy terminology—word clouds, dashboards, a litany of linguistics jargon— into what amounts to a bloated, inefficient enterprise platform when most of us just need answers to business questions.

And they’re expensive. You won’t even qualify for a Clarabridge demo unless you have a six-figure budget.

A lot of Time, A Lot of Effort, No Results?

Experts and economists stress that increasing productivity should be a primary concern among companies in 2017.

The only thing potentially more time-consuming than getting buy-in for a six-figure investment in text analytics software like Clarabridge may be implementing it.

These platforms require extensive training and rely on antiquated rules-based approaches and custom dictionaries that require frequent updates.

While you’re spending all of this time and effort in meetings to get the solution in place, the job you bought it for isn’t getting done.

By contrast, OdinText takes only one hour of training to get started, it scales beautifully and your team can be conducting actual text analytics in January!

So…How Will You Spend Your Time and Budget Next Year?

Next year, would you prefer to be talking about text analytics or actually doing them?

The way I see it, you have two choices:

  1. Spend six months to a year or more assessing and debating an investment internally and then trying to implement a behemoth text analytics platform across your company.

Or

  1. Hit the ground running with a no-nonsense tool to quickly and effectively get practical answers to real business questions.

Don’t spend 2017 trying to dance with a lumberjack in a tutu. OdinText was designed by researchers for researchers - Get the job done!

Contact us today to arrange a demo using your own data and find out how your organization can be up and running text analytics in as little as a few weeks.

@TomHCAnderson

tomtextanalyticstips

Tom H. C. Anderson OdinText Inc. www.odintext.com

 

ABOUT ODINTEXT

OdinText is a patented SaaS (software-as-a-service) platform for advanced analytics. Fortune 500 companies such as Disney and Shell Oil use OdinText to mine insights from complex, unstructured text data. The technology is available through the venture-backed Stamford, CT firm of the same name founded by CEO Tom H. C. Anderson, a recognized authority and pioneer in the field of text analytics with more than two decades of experience in market research. Anderson is the recipient of numerous awards for innovation from industry associations such as ESOMAR, CASRO, the ARF and the American Marketing Association. He tweets under the handle @tomhcanderson.

 

Buyer Beware: What Text Analytics Providers Won’t Tell You.
BOTH DEC 728X90

BOTH DEC 728X90

Text Analytics May Not Be For You

[video width="1280" height="720" mp4="http://odintext.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/IS-TEXT-ANALYTICS-YOU-VIDEO.mp4"][/video]

If you’re in market research and aren’t at least exploring text analysis software, you’re part of a shrinking minority. But you probably know this already, if only from the preponderance of conference presentations, blogs and trade articles on the topic. Yes, text analytics are all the rage these days.

You may feel under the gun to catch up, but if you’re late to the game, you may be comforted to know that for many people, text analytics aren’t living up to the hype.

Nearly every researcher I come in contact with at conferences and through my professional network is at least actively investigating text analysis if they haven’t already adopted a solution. And in either case, they’re frequently underwhelmed.

It’s my experience that there are two primary reasons for this:

  1. Despite the hype, text analytics are NOT for everyone

And

  1. Researchers too often buy technology when what they need is an insights solution

How Do I Know Before I Buy?

You heard me. Not everyone needs text analytics. And that’s because not all data merit or are even suited to text analysis, nor is every business question.

I see researchers buying buzzwords like “sentiment” or “artificial intelligence,” when what they need is to understand what drives customer satisfaction, what drives loyalty, what drives behavior or revenue…

The first things you should ask are: 1. Do I need text analytics to answer my business questions? and 2. Do I have the right data for it?

Most text analytics software providers will give you a resounding “Yes!” to both questions. (Shocking, I know.)

Then they’ll set up a dog-and-pony demo, possibly using data similar to yours, but it isn’t your data.

What they won’t do is take the time to honestly determine whether or not what they’re trying to sell you makes sense for you.

And they won’t confirm it by running your actual data before you buy.

Do a Demo with Your Own Data Before the Year is Out!

It’s Q4, which means that from now until the end the year, my colleagues and I are going to get a lot of calls from researchers who need to spend what’s left of their budgets and who are convinced that they need a text analysis tool.

But before we even discuss an OdinText demo, we will take the time to figure out for certain whether they actually need us.

And if it looks like a fit, we’ll arrange a demo using their actual data to be sure.

Whether you haven’t yet found a text analytics solution that works for you or you just feel pressured to adopt a tool before the year is out, I am telling you that text analytics may not be the right answer for you.

Find out for sure. Before you close the books on 2016, call us to arrange a phone consultation and take an OdinText demo with YOUR OWN DATA!

We won’t sell you what you don’t need.

@TomHCAnderson

Tom H. C. Anderson

OdinText Inc. www.odintext.com

888.891.3115 x 701