Posts tagged NLP
Text Analytics Picks the 10 Strongest Super Bowls Ads

New Text Analytics PollTM Shows Which Super Bowl Ads Really Performed Best Well, it’s been five days since the Super Bowl, and pretty much everyone has cranked out a “definitive” best-and-worst ad list or some sort of top 10 ranking. And frankly, I think a lot of them are based on the wrong metrics.

Without a doubt, what makes a Super Bowl ad great differs from what makes a “normal” ad great. So what exactly qualifies a Super Bowl ad as a success or failure?

We could look at purchase consideration or intent, likelihood to recommend, or any of a dozen or more other popular advertising metrics, but that’s not what Super Bowl advertising effectiveness is really about.

Word of mouth has always been a big one and nowadays that means social media buzz. But does buzz equate to success? Ask the folks at Budweiser or Lumber 84.

Bottom line: This is a very expensive reach buy, first and foremost, and it’s a branding exercise.  I’ve shelled out $5 million (plus production costs) for 30 seconds to make a lasting and largely unconscious impression on the world’s biggest television audience.

As far as I’m concerned there need only be three objectives then:

  1. I want you to remember the ad;
  2. I want you to remember it’s my ad;
  3. I want you to feel positive about it.

Whether or not my ad met all of these criteria can be answered with one single unstructured question in a Text Analytics PollTM and quickly be analyzed by NLP software like OdinText with more valid results than any multiple-choice instrument.

Why a Text Analytics PollTM ?

Using a Likert scale to assess recall or awareness will only provide an aided response; I can’t ask you about an ad or brand without mentioning it. So I don’t really know if the ad was actually that memorable. And while a quantitative instrument can tell me whether or not you liked or disliked an ad, it also won’t tell me why.

Conversely, I can get the “why” from traditional qualitative tools like focus groups or IDIs, but not only would those insights be time-consuming, labor-intensive and expensive to gather, they wouldn’t be quantified.

But if I ask you to just tell me what you remember in your own words using a comment box, I can find out which ad was truly memorable, ascertain whether or not you truly recall the brand, determine whether the ad left a positive or negative impression on you and get a much deeper understanding of why. I can achieve all of this using one open-ended question. And with text analytics software like OdinText, I can quantify these results.

Which Super Bowl Ads Did “Best”?

We asked a random, gen pop sample of n=4,535 people (statistics with a confidence interval of +/- 1.46) one simple question:

“What Super Bowl ad stood out the most to you and why?”

Author’s note: We ran this survey Sunday night and closed it Monday night. We were originally planning to post the results on Tuesday, but decided to postpone it in favor of sharing what we felt were more pressing results from a Text Analytics PollTM we had conducted around President Trump’s immigration ban.

As you can see in the table below, this one simple question told us everything we needed to know…

Top 10 Super Bowl Ads: Memorability of Ad & Brand, and Degree of Positive Sentiment

The following ads are ranked according to memorability—respondents’ unaided recall of both the ad and the brand—accompanied by positive/negative sentiment breakout (blue for positive, orange for negative) in reverse order. Author’s note: The verbatim examples included here are [sic]

#10 Pepsi

 

 

As the sponsor of the Lady Gaga halftime show, one might expect Pepsi to do very well, but Lady Gaga may have literally stolen the show from Pepsi! In fact, the halftime show was actually mentioned more often in the comment data than Pepsi, and the two were infrequently mentioned together. Meanwhile, Pepsi’s ads were relatively unmemorable and much of the awareness we saw was in the form of negative sentiment.

Author’s note: Interestingly, social media monitoring services like Sprinkler had reported Pepsi “owned” the Super Bowl ad chatter on social media. I’ll say it not for the first time: social media (aka Twitter) can be full of spam often generated by agents of the brand.

 

#9 Buick

This is a case where the star of the ad, Cam Newton, didn’t eclipse the sponsor. People liked the pro footballer playing with the little kids and the tie-in to football seemed to work well. We saw this with Tom Brady in a different ad, too.

Buick with Cam Newton, cute and funny

I like the Buick ad because it let a bunch of kids play football with Cam Newton.

So what’s not to like, you say? How did it garner even a 13% unfavorable rating?

cam newton pushed little kids

The buick commercial, the concept was boring

Buick, it was not even funny

 

#8 Skittles

 

Skittles, made my kids laugh

The Skittles ad because it was funny and sort of relate-able. It shows how far one is willing to do something for someone.

Humor generally always does well, so what’s not to like?

The skittles commercial it made no sense

skittles, stupid with the burglar

Skittles, it was creepy. And what was with the gopher at the end?

 

#7 T-Mobile

Popular and a little risqué… [Note Also, Sprint Ads were often mis-remembered as T-Mobile, perhaps Halo effect and a reason Sprint didn't make the Top 10...]

The T-Mobile ‘fake your own death to escape Verizon bill’ it was very funny, and got its point across very well

T-mobile. very funny parodying 50 shades of gray to Verizon ‘screwing its customers!’

T-Mobile with Justin. Maybe because I'm a T-Mobile subscriber? Or Justin Bieber was dressed so well in a suit, and then he starts dancing and jumping like a maniac. The contrast makes it funny.

T mobile add where guy faking death. Most memorable. Light hearted. Got point across.

BUT not everyone is a Belieber

The t mobile justin biber. It was kinda lame

T-Mobile w/Justin Bieber - inane, juvenile, bordering on insulting

T-Mobile Unlimited Moves. It wasnt funny and Justin Bieber looked like the six flags guy.

T-Mobile, awkward dancing as they attempted to appeal to teenagers

 

#6  Audi

Audi took on gender equality with an appeal to fathers of daughters. The resulting ad was memorable in 6th place:

The audi one because it was meaningful

Audi - moving story and loved the message of what to tell daughters!

Audi. I have a daughter

Audi - moving story and loved the message of what to tell daughters!

However, not everyone liked mixing politics or social issues with their football (as we will see again for some of the other top ads):

AUDI and 84 Lumber. Keep your political message out of my entertainment

Least liked Audi because it was a liberal ad

 

#5 Coca-Cola

Ironically, even without sponsoring the halftime show, Coca-Cola beat Pepsi.

The coke commercial was really meaningful and symbolic

Coca Cola because of the embracing of diversity

Coca Cola True portrayal of America's diversity

The coke ad. I liked the pro-refugee stance.

coke america is beautiful commercial, very admirable

Coca Cola Commercial because it's all about being connected

Coke , showing we are still interconnected regardless of ethnicity

I liked the coca cola ad at the very beginning. I've seen it before but I think the message is so powerful and the commercial is beautifully executed.

But the ad was not received well by many, likely in part due to the politically-charged climate. Several advertisers ran messages that struck people as being politically biased or advancing a political agenda—something not everyone cared for…

Didn’t appreciate Coca Cola trying to make a political statement

I didn't like the Coke commercial. They showed it two years ago and the year before.

Google and Coke because they shoved their political views into my face.

 

#4 Mr. Clean

Who would have predicted MR. Clean for fourth place? The brand made good use of humor, and it stood out from the other ads by targeting women (but appealed to members of both genders).

Mr clean, it was funny - Female

Mr. Clean because I'm bald -  Male

Mr. Clean, relatable, memorable, hilarious. -Female

The Mr. Clean commercial, it was funny, tasty, and got the point across. Incredibly well done ad. – Male

Mr clean because my wife pointed it out – Male

mr clean because it relates to family, and parents that stay at home and clean. it was family friendly - Female

mr clean everything else sucked – Gender Not Specified

Some men though didn’t see the humor and or get the point, calling it “weird”. It wasn’t really that they disliked it intensely; they just felt it wasn’t for them.

 

#3 Lumber 84

Not many had heard of this company before the Super Bowl, but I’ll bet you know who they are now. The third most memorable ad, yes, but more than half of those who remembered it had nothing nice to say!

First, among those who liked the ad:

It was so touching

Audi, 84 lumber, both showed compassionate ads

84 lumber - it's the only one I can remember

84 Lumber - Showed what America is actually supposed to be.

they were obviously trying to get across a non- traditional message that didn't seem to be advertising. Also it was beautifully and compellingly produced.

Lumber 84 showed that not everyone wants a wall and that we understand there is power in diversity.

But the execution confused people and whatever the intention, the sponsor stepped into a controversy. Here the emotional sentiment (particularly anger) ran high and was prevalent in comments like “romanticized crime” and “forced politics”:

The Journey 84 ad, it just left me confused

The 84 lumber commercial. It didn't make sense

it was about illegals sneaking into America, i won't be shopping their anymore

Lumber 84 because it was politically offensive

84 lumber, clearly a political statement and uncalled for

84 lumber, Made no sense, Not going to look something up

#2 Kia

Ironically, with other brands going serious and political, Kia poked some fun with help from Melissa McCarthy. Kia’s investment in humor and McCarthy paid off in a big way, scoring the highest combination of memorability and positive sentiment, although to an extent the comedian eclipsed the brand.

Loved melissa McCarthy because she is hilarious and i love her.

Kia it was funny and not somber like most the others

The Buick one, the world of tanks ones and the eco friendly Melissa one because they were the funniest

The one with Melissa McCarthy because it made me laugh

KIA becuase it didn't feel like it was trying to sell me anything, just entertain with brand placement

 

#1 Budweiser

Yes, Budweiser took first place in terms of recall, but the perception of a political bent cost the king of beers. The ad, which featured one of the founders struggling as an immigrant, was apparently in the works before the Trump Immigration Order controversy. But even if that was the case, by choosing to air it Budweiser took a risk.

Likes:

I liked the Budweiser commercial reminded us all that not all white Europeans were always welcome in the US.

Budweiser. I love the reminder that we are all immigrants

Budweiser immigration. Shows Trump is an idiot, but we all know that

The Budweiser ad about how they were founded by an immigrant, because it was actually relevant to their company history

Budweiser, it was a beautiful immigrant's tale. Not overtly political

The Budweiser commercial because it shows what a true immigrant had to go through and even though many people thought it was to take a shot at Trump's travel ban it had nothing to do with it.

Dislikes:

Budweiser. Too liberal.

budweiser, too pro immigration

bud, adolfus was not ILLEGAL !

The Budweiser ad about immigration. Too political.

Budweiser, they shot themselves in the foot being that the man who immigrated into the U.S. did so legally.

Budweiser. Football/all sports should not involve politics. We need to relax sometimes.

So…who won?

Isn’t it obvious? I’d say Kia. Sure, Budweiser scored higher unaided awareness, but a significant portion of that was negative.

But it's all in the data, what do you think?

A Final Note on Text Analytics PollsTM 

It occurred to me in writing this post that about 11 years ago almost to the day I predicted that the survey of the future would be a one-question open-end, because that’s all people really want to tell you, and that’s all you’ll need.

Turns out I may have been right.

This week, we’ve shared results from three such surveys, a technique we've dubbed “Text Analytics PollTM .

These incredibly short, one-question polls allow us to field quickly to large samples with minimal burden on the respondent. And text analysis software such as OdinText enables us to quantify these huge quantities of comments.

But the real advantage to using text analytics polls is that the responses tell us so much more than whether someone agrees/disagrees or likes/dislikes. Using text analytics we can uncover why from respondents in their own words.

Thanks again for reading!

@TomHCAnderson @OdinText

Could a text analytics poll answer your burning marketing questions?  Contact us to see if a single-question open-ended survey makes sense for you!

 

About Tom H. C. Anderson

Tom H. C. Anderson is the founder and managing partner of OdinText, a venture-backed firm based in Stamford, CT whose eponymous, patented SAS platform is used by Fortune 500 companies like Disney, Coca-Cola and Shell Oil to mine insights from complex, unstructured and mixed data. A recognized authority and pioneer in the field of text analytics with more than two decades of experience in market research, Anderson is the recipient of numerous awards for innovation from industry associations such as CASRO, ESOMAR and the ARF. He was named one of the "Four under 40" market research leaders by the American Marketing Association in 2010. He  tweets under the handle @tomhcanderson.

 

 

 

Why Communicating with Aliens is Easier than You Think – And What It Means for Your Company

The Movie “Arrival,” Text Analytics and Machine Translation When I speak with prospective OdinText users who’ve been exposed to other text analytics software providers, I find they tend to mention and ask about things like POS tagging, taxonomies, ontologies, etc.

These terms come from linguistics, the discipline upon which many of the text analytics software platforms in the market today are predicated.

But you may be surprised to learn that as a basis for text analytics, linguistics is shockingly inefficient compared to approaches that rely on mathematics/statistics.

One of the most popular movies in theaters right now, “Arrival,” inadvertently makes this case rather well.

Understanding Alien Languages is Easy (Provided You’re Not a Linguist)

arrivallanguage

arrivallanguage

“Arrival” begins with a flock of spaceships touching down in locations around the world. Linguistics professor Louise Banks (Amy Adams) is then recruited to lead an elite team of experts in a race against time to find a way to communicate with the extraterrestrial visitors and avert a global war.

The film proceeds to build a lot of drama around a pretty minor problem of language analysis and translation—conveniently consuming several months during which the plot can thicken—when, in fact, the task of understanding an alien language like in the movie would be quite EASY.

I daresay in all modesty that I could have done this in a fraction of the time with OdinText and with a much smaller team than Adams’ character had!

arrival-human

arrival-human

It Only Takes a Few Words

In her first conversation with the aliens, Louise introduces herself by writing the word “human” on a little whiteboard she carries, to which the aliens respond by introducing themselves in their language.

After this initial exchange, in the real world, only a few more words would be necessary to start creating and applying a code book (a taxonomy or ontology in linguistics speak), which would allow one to quickly translate anything else said and to then communicate via a small, imperfect but highly effective vocabulary.

For example, a little later in the movie, one of the aliens tells Louise that another alien who is missing from their meeting that day is “in the death process,” which, of course, means the other alien is absent because he is dying.

Everyone in the audience gets what the alien means by “in the death process.”  Indeed, communicating successfully with a small, imperfect vocabulary like this is far more efficient and reliable than one might assume. My two-year-old son and I are quite good at communicating in these sorts of two- or three-word phrases.  And no parts of speech tagging are necessary (nor would they be very helpful here).

I’ll come back to this idea of small, imperfect but surprisingly efficient vocabularies in a bit. But first, let’s consider a related but more challenging matter: breaking code.

How the Allies Used Text Analytics to Break the German Code

Compared to translating an alien language, it would be only slightly more difficult—though honestly not that much more difficult—to crack the Nazi Enigma code that helped the Allies win WWII today using OdinText.

Why more difficult? Because unlike the aliens in “Arrival,” who actually want the humans to learn their language in order to communicate, the Nazis wanted their encrypted language to stay indecipherable.

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH stars in THE IMITATION GAME

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH stars in THE IMITATION GAME

In the 2014 movie “The Imitation Game,” Benedict Cumberbatch stars as Alan Turing, the genius British mathematician, logician, cryptologist and computer scientist who led the effort to crack the German code.

In contrast to “Arrival,” the drama in “The Imitation Game” centers on Turing’s determination to build a decryption machine, instead of attempting to decode Enigma by hand like every other scientist assigned to the task.

When his boss refuses to fund his machine’s construction, Turing writes to Churchill, who arranges the funding and names him team leader. Turing subsequently fires the key linguists from the project and the linguistic approach to this text analysis (i.e., code breaking) is chucked in favor of computational mathematics.

Turing’s machine is, of course, critical to the solution (though the technology is simple by today’s standards), but the real breakthrough happens when the scientists realize that the machine can be sped up by recognizing routinely used phrases like “Heil Hitler” (again providing a basic code frame or taxonomy).

The Turing Test: Did You Know You Were Talking to a Computer?

In computer engineering classes on artificial intelligence there is an oft-mentioned thought experiment called “The Chinese Room,” which is used to think about the differences between human and computer cognition. It’s often referenced when discussing the Turing Test, which assesses computer intelligence based on whether a human being can distinguish between a computer and a human being’s replies to the same questions.

Going back now to my earlier point about a small taxonomy being sufficient for communication, and keeping in mind that today’s far more powerful computers running Google Translate or OdinText can process unstructured text data in any language order of magnitudes faster than any human or Turing’s machine, I think The Chinese Room analogy is not just an interesting AI thought experiment, but a good way to explain why translating the alien language in “Arrival” should have been so much easier than the film made it out to be.

The Chinese Room

Imagine for a moment a room with no windows, only a door with a small mail slot.

In the room, we find an average English speaker recruited randomly off the street, someone without any advanced education or background in foreign languages or linguistics.

This person has been paid to spend the day in this room and given a code book for a “squiggly language” he/she has been tasked with translating. In the story, it’s typically Chinese, but it could be any foreign language with which the person is totally unfamiliar. Let’s assume Chinese to stay close to the original story.

After giving him/her this code book—basically an English-to-Chinese/Chinese-to-English dictionary—we tell this person that on occasion we may pass them a note written in Chinese and that they will need to use the code book to figure out what the message means in English. Likewise, if they need anything—water, food, bathroom break, etc.—they will need to pass the request in a note written in Chinese back through the mail slot to us.

Note that this person has ABSOLUTELY NO TRAINING in the syntax or grammar of Chinese. His/her notes may be rudimentary, but certainly they will still be understood.

What’s more, if a native Chinese speaker walked by and observed the notes coming out, they would probably assume that there was a Chinese speaker in the room.

Now, instead of a code book, suppose the person in the room was using a computer program like Google Translate or OdinText, which can instantaneously translate or otherwise process any number of words coming out of the room, making it even more likely that the Chinese-speaking passerby assumes the person in the room speaks Chinese.

Think about this the next time you’re wondering whether data translated by machine—which is so much faster and cheaper than human translation—is sufficient for text analytics purposes (i.e. understanding what hundreds or hundreds of thousands of humans are saying in some foreign language).

My strong belief is yes, definitely. Whether I’m looking at Swedish or Chinese, I’m always rather impressed by how on point today’s computer translation is, and how irrelevant any nuance is, especially at the aggregate level, which is usually where we need to be.

You don’t need a team of NASA scientists, nor a month to do it. You can have it ready by morning! The technology is already here!

@TomHCAnderson

  1. To learn more about how OdinText can help you learn what really matters to your customers and predict real behavior here on Earth, please contact us or request a FREE demo using your own data here!

[Key Terms: AI, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Translation, Text Analytics, Linguistics, Computational Linguistics, Taxonomies, Ontologies, Natural Language Processing, NLP]

tomtextanalyticstips

tomtextanalyticstips

Tom H. C. Anderson OdinText Inc. www.odintext.com

ABOUT ODINTEXT

OdinText is a patented SaaS (software-as-a-service) platform for advanced analytics. Fortune 500 companies such as Disney and Shell Oil use OdinText to mine insights from complex, unstructured text data. The technology is available through the venture-backed Stamford, CT firm of the same name founded by CEO Tom H. C. Anderson, a recognized authority and pioneer in the field of text analytics with more than two decades of experience in market research. Anderson is the recipient of numerous awards for innovation from industry associations such as ESOMAR, CASRO, the ARF and the American Marketing Association. He tweets under the handle @tomhcanderson.