Posts tagged Critical Mix
Look Who’s Talking, Part 1: Who Are the Most Frequently Mentioned Research Panels?

Survey Takers Average Two Panel Memberships and Name Names

Who exactly is taking your survey?

It’s an important question beyond the obvious reasons and odds are your screener isn’t providing all of the answers.

Today’s blog post will be the first in a series previewing some key findings from a new study exploring the characteristics of survey research panelists.

The study was designed and conducted by Kerry Hecht, Director of Research at Ramius. OdinText was enlisted to analyze the text responses to the open-ended questions in the survey.

Today I’ll be sharing an OdinText analysis of results from one simple but important question: Which research companies are you signed up with?

Note: The full findings of this rather elaborate study will be released in June in a special workshop at IIEX North America (Insight Innovation Exchange) in Atlanta, GA. The workshop will be led by Kerry Hecht, Jessica Broome and yours truly. For more information, click here.

About the Data

The dataset we’ve used OdinText to analyze today is a survey of research panel members with just over 1,500 completes.

The sample was sourced in three equal parts from leading research panel providers Critical Mix and Schlesinger Associates and from third-party loyalty reward site Swagbucks, respectively.

The study’s author opted to use an open-ended question (“Which research companies are you signed up with?”) instead of a “select all that apply” variation for a couple of reasons, not the least of which being that the latter would’ve needed to list more than a thousand possible panel choices.

Only those panels that were mentioned by at least five respondents (0.3%) were included in the analysis. As it turned out, respondents identified more than 50 panels by name.

How Many Panels Does the Average Panelist Belong To?

The overwhelming majority of respondents—approx. 80%—indicated they belong to only one or two panels. (The average number of panels mentioned among those who could recall specific panel names was 2.3.)

Less than 2% told us they were members of 10 or more panels.

Finally, even fewer respondents told us they were members of as many as 20+ panels; others could not recall the name of a single panel when asked. Some declined to answer the question.

Naming Names…Here’s Who

Caption: To see the data more closely, please click this screenshot for an Excel file. 

In Figure 1 we have the 50 most frequently mentioned panel companies by respondents in this survey.

It is interesting to note that even though every respondent was signed up with at least one of the three companies from which we sourced the sample, a third of respondents failed to name that company.

Who Else? Average Number of Other Panels Mentioned

Caption: To see the data more closely, please click this screenshot for an Excel file.

As expected—and, again, taking the fact that the sample comes from each of just three firms we mentioned earlier—larger panels are more likely than smaller, niche panels to contain respondents who belong to other panels (Figure 2).

Panel Overlap/Correlation

Finally, we correlate the mentions of panels (Figure 3) and see that while there is some overlap everywhere, it looks to be relatively evenly distributed.

Caption: To see the data more closely, please click this screenshot for an Excel file.

Finally, we correlate the mentions of panels (Figure 3) and see that while there is some overlap everywhere, it looks to be relatively evenly distributed. In a few cases where correlation ishigher, it may be that these panels tend to recruit in the same place online or that there is a relationship between the companies.

What’s Next?

Again, all of the data provided above are the result of analyzing just a single, short open-ended question using OdinText.

In subsequent posts, we will look into what motivates these panelists to participate in research, as well as what they like and don’t like about the research process. We’ll also look more closely at demographics and psychographics.

You can also look forward to deeper insights from a qualitative leg provided by Kerry Hecht and her team in the workshop at IIEX in June.


Thank you for your readership. As always, I encourage your feedback and look forward to your comments!

@TomHCanderson @OdinText

Tom H.C. Anderson

PS. Just a reminder that OdinText is participating in the IIEX 2016 Insight Innovation Competition!

Voting ends Today! Please visit MAKE DATA ACCESSIBLE and VOTE OdinText!

 

[If you would like to attend IIEX feel free to use our Speaker discount code ODINTEXT]

To learn more about how OdinText can help you understand what really matters to your customers and predict actual behavior,  please contact us or request a Free Demo here >

[NOTE: Tom H. C. Anderson is Founder of Next Generation Text Analytics software firm OdinText Inc. Click here for more Text Analytics Tips ]